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Penetration of aluminium salts through pig skin in vitro

Siemund, I. LU ; Bergendorff, O. LU ; Zimerson, E. LU ; Persson, Christina LU ; Hindsén, M. LU and Bruze, M. LU (2012) 11th Congress of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) In Contact Dermatitis 66(s2). p.52-52
Abstract
Background: Recently it was suggested to use aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 10% to detect aluminium contact allergy. Patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 20% did not demonstrate a higher number of positive test reactions. It was speculated that the constricting effect of aluminium salts might impair skin penetration. Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to estimate the concentration of aluminium in various skin layers and in the recipient phase using different aluminium test preparations on pig skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system. Methods: Full-thickness (7sim; porcine ear skin was mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells. The diffusional area was 0.64 cm2 and recipient volume 4 ml. The dermal... (More)
Background: Recently it was suggested to use aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 10% to detect aluminium contact allergy. Patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 20% did not demonstrate a higher number of positive test reactions. It was speculated that the constricting effect of aluminium salts might impair skin penetration. Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to estimate the concentration of aluminium in various skin layers and in the recipient phase using different aluminium test preparations on pig skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system. Methods: Full-thickness (7sim; porcine ear skin was mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells. The diffusional area was 0.64 cm2 and recipient volume 4 ml. The dermal side was exposed to a recipient solution consisting of PBS (phosphate buffer saline, pH 7.4). Aluminium chloride hexahydrate preparations in petrolatum and in water at 10% were applied to the donor compartment facing the epidermis for 24 hr. All samples were analysed for total aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry. The limit of detection was 0.01 μg/ml. Results: No aluminium could be detected in the recipient phase in the six diffusion cells. Conclusions: Neither aluminium in petrolatum nor in water gave detectable amounts of penetrating aluminium in 24 h. The lipophilicity of the vehicle was not decisive. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
aluminum salt, aluminum, petrolatum, aluminum chloride, water, sodium chloride, phosphate, pig, skin, in vitro study, society, contact dermatitis, recipient, diffusion, lipophilicity, atomic absorption spectrometry, epidermis, skin penetration, donor, pH, limit of detection, ear, thickness, contact allergy
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
66
issue
s2
pages
52 - 52
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
conference name
11th Congress of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD)
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02111.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2717cc84-b048-4695-8950-55e17f192f04
date added to LUP
2017-06-15 14:18:06
date last changed
2017-06-20 14:56:49
@misc{2717cc84-b048-4695-8950-55e17f192f04,
  abstract     = {Background: Recently it was suggested to use aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 10% to detect aluminium contact allergy. Patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 20% did not demonstrate a higher number of positive test reactions. It was speculated that the constricting effect of aluminium salts might impair skin penetration. Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to estimate the concentration of aluminium in various skin layers and in the recipient phase using different aluminium test preparations on pig skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system. Methods: Full-thickness (7sim; porcine ear skin was mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells. The diffusional area was 0.64 cm2 and recipient volume 4 ml. The dermal side was exposed to a recipient solution consisting of PBS (phosphate buffer saline, pH 7.4). Aluminium chloride hexahydrate preparations in petrolatum and in water at 10% were applied to the donor compartment facing the epidermis for 24 hr. All samples were analysed for total aluminium by atomic absorption spectrometry. The limit of detection was 0.01 μg/ml. Results: No aluminium could be detected in the recipient phase in the six diffusion cells. Conclusions: Neither aluminium in petrolatum nor in water gave detectable amounts of penetrating aluminium in 24 h. The lipophilicity of the vehicle was not decisive.},
  author       = {Siemund, I. and Bergendorff, O. and Zimerson, E. and Persson, Christina and Hindsén, M. and Bruze, M.},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {aluminum salt,aluminum,petrolatum,aluminum chloride,water,sodium chloride,phosphate,pig,skin,in vitro study,society,contact dermatitis,recipient,diffusion,lipophilicity,atomic absorption spectrometry,epidermis,skin penetration,donor,pH,limit of detection,ear,thickness,contact allergy},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  note         = {Conference Abstract},
  number       = {s2},
  pages        = {52--52},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Penetration of aluminium salts through pig skin in vitro},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02111.x},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2012},
}