Advanced

Risk, information and incentives in telecom supply chains

Agrell, Per J; Lindroth, Robert LU and Norrman, Andreas LU (2004) In International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00 90(1). p.1-16
Abstract
Supply chain management involves the selection, coordination and motivation of independently operated suppliers. The central planner's perspective in operations management translates poorly to vertically separated chains, where suppliers recurrently seem to object to benevolent information sharing and centralized decision rights. Seen from the supplier's perspective, such resistance may very well be rational. A downstream assembly line disclosing reliable information on actual and forecasted sales puts itself at a disadvantage when bargaining on share of chain profits. In this paper, we use a minimal agency model to contrast known optimal mechanisms with the actual practice in the telecommunications industry. A three-stage supply chain... (More)
Supply chain management involves the selection, coordination and motivation of independently operated suppliers. The central planner's perspective in operations management translates poorly to vertically separated chains, where suppliers recurrently seem to object to benevolent information sharing and centralized decision rights. Seen from the supplier's perspective, such resistance may very well be rational. A downstream assembly line disclosing reliable information on actual and forecasted sales puts itself at a disadvantage when bargaining on share of chain profits. In this paper, we use a minimal agency model to contrast known optimal mechanisms with the actual practice in the telecommunications industry. A three-stage supply chain under stochastic demand and varying coordination and information asymmetry is modeled. A two-period investment-production game addresses the information sharing and specific investment problem in the telecom industry. The observed price-quantity contracts under limited commitment are shown to be inadequate under realistic asymmetric information assumptions. More a result of gradually evolving changes in bargaining power than coordination efforts, the upstream urge to coordinate may further deteriorate performance in terms of our model. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
contracts, coordination, capacity, supply chain
in
International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00
volume
90
issue
1
pages
1 - 16
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000222073500001
  • scopus:2642525496
ISSN
0925-5273
DOI
10.1016/S0925-5273(02)00471-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b25bed48-fe65-47df-ae39-66d1d9526cbc (old id 275302)
date added to LUP
2007-08-28 16:20:00
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:07:43
@article{b25bed48-fe65-47df-ae39-66d1d9526cbc,
  abstract     = {Supply chain management involves the selection, coordination and motivation of independently operated suppliers. The central planner's perspective in operations management translates poorly to vertically separated chains, where suppliers recurrently seem to object to benevolent information sharing and centralized decision rights. Seen from the supplier's perspective, such resistance may very well be rational. A downstream assembly line disclosing reliable information on actual and forecasted sales puts itself at a disadvantage when bargaining on share of chain profits. In this paper, we use a minimal agency model to contrast known optimal mechanisms with the actual practice in the telecommunications industry. A three-stage supply chain under stochastic demand and varying coordination and information asymmetry is modeled. A two-period investment-production game addresses the information sharing and specific investment problem in the telecom industry. The observed price-quantity contracts under limited commitment are shown to be inadequate under realistic asymmetric information assumptions. More a result of gradually evolving changes in bargaining power than coordination efforts, the upstream urge to coordinate may further deteriorate performance in terms of our model. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Agrell, Per J and Lindroth, Robert and Norrman, Andreas},
  issn         = {0925-5273},
  keyword      = {contracts,coordination,capacity,supply chain},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--16},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Production Economics1991-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Risk, information and incentives in telecom supply chains},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0925-5273(02)00471-1},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2004},
}