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Boys have better short-term and long-term survival rates after intensive care admissions than girls

Johansson Frigyesi, E.; Andersson, Peder LU and Frigyesi, A. LU (2017) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Abstract

Aim: We investigated possible gender differences in paediatric intensive care morbidity-adjusted mortality. Methods: In this study, data on all 21 972 paediatric intensive care admissions in Sweden between 2008 and 2015 were analysed regarding morbidity-adjusted survival, using Cox regression, with age, gender and estimated mortality ratio as dependent variables and using the standardised mortality ratio at 90 days after admission. The data were obtained from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry. Results: We found that boys had better overall survival than girls (hazard ratio 0.91 for boys, p = 0.035). In addition, the 90-day survival was also better for boys (standardised mortality ratio 0.85 for boys versus 1.02 for girls, p = 0.0014).... (More)

Aim: We investigated possible gender differences in paediatric intensive care morbidity-adjusted mortality. Methods: In this study, data on all 21 972 paediatric intensive care admissions in Sweden between 2008 and 2015 were analysed regarding morbidity-adjusted survival, using Cox regression, with age, gender and estimated mortality ratio as dependent variables and using the standardised mortality ratio at 90 days after admission. The data were obtained from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry. Results: We found that boys had better overall survival than girls (hazard ratio 0.91 for boys, p = 0.035). In addition, the 90-day survival was also better for boys (standardised mortality ratio 0.85 for boys versus 1.02 for girls, p = 0.0014). The survival advantage was most evident in children less than a year old and for nonsurgical patients. The male advantage was also seen in children admitted with respiratory insufficiency and seizures and was furthermore independent of any concurrent cardiac condition. We did not find any gender difference in the intensity of care or length of stay when corrected for morbidity. Conclusion: This study showed that boys have better outcomes than girls after intensive care admissions. The difference does not seem to be based on inequality of care.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Epidemiology, Gender differences, Inequality, Mortality, Paediatric intensive care
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85030031788
  • wos:000414913500016
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1111/apa.14044
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27857b37-eddd-4188-93ea-370046ab910e
date added to LUP
2017-10-09 11:07:13
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:21:47
@article{27857b37-eddd-4188-93ea-370046ab910e,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: We investigated possible gender differences in paediatric intensive care morbidity-adjusted mortality. Methods: In this study, data on all 21 972 paediatric intensive care admissions in Sweden between 2008 and 2015 were analysed regarding morbidity-adjusted survival, using Cox regression, with age, gender and estimated mortality ratio as dependent variables and using the standardised mortality ratio at 90 days after admission. The data were obtained from the Swedish Intensive Care Registry. Results: We found that boys had better overall survival than girls (hazard ratio 0.91 for boys, p = 0.035). In addition, the 90-day survival was also better for boys (standardised mortality ratio 0.85 for boys versus 1.02 for girls, p = 0.0014). The survival advantage was most evident in children less than a year old and for nonsurgical patients. The male advantage was also seen in children admitted with respiratory insufficiency and seizures and was furthermore independent of any concurrent cardiac condition. We did not find any gender difference in the intensity of care or length of stay when corrected for morbidity. Conclusion: This study showed that boys have better outcomes than girls after intensive care admissions. The difference does not seem to be based on inequality of care.</p>},
  author       = {Johansson Frigyesi, E. and Andersson, Peder and Frigyesi, A.},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  keyword      = {Epidemiology,Gender differences,Inequality,Mortality,Paediatric intensive care},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {Boys have better short-term and long-term survival rates after intensive care admissions than girls},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.14044},
  year         = {2017},
}