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Insects and other invertebrate remains from the coffin of a 17th century bishop in Lund Minster, S Sweden

Fägerström, Christoffer LU ; Buckland, Philip ; Lemdahl, Geoffrey ; Karsten, Per LU ; Lagerås, Per LU and Manhag, Andreas LU (2020) In Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 31.
Abstract
An extraordinarily diverse and well-preserved material, including the remains of 47 insect taxa and 12 taxa of other invertebrates, extracted from the 17th century burial of Bishop Peder Winstrup in Lund Minster, is presented and discussed in terms of the treatment of the body, activities connected with the burial and faunal significance. The invertebrate assemblages include species from gardens, insects feeding on living plants as well as dried or decaying plant matter. Many of the species are regarded as closely associated with humans (synanthropic), and a number of these are associated with outbuildings, such as stables and cellars. The absence of species associated with cadavers (necrophilous taxa) in the studied insect material is... (More)
An extraordinarily diverse and well-preserved material, including the remains of 47 insect taxa and 12 taxa of other invertebrates, extracted from the 17th century burial of Bishop Peder Winstrup in Lund Minster, is presented and discussed in terms of the treatment of the body, activities connected with the burial and faunal significance. The invertebrate assemblages include species from gardens, insects feeding on living plants as well as dried or decaying plant matter. Many of the species are regarded as closely associated with humans (synanthropic), and a number of these are associated with outbuildings, such as stables and cellars. The absence of species associated with cadavers (necrophilous taxa) in the studied insect material is significant. The most plausible explanation is that the bishop died, and was buried during the winter, when such species are inactive, and thus precluded from colonising the body. A number of species were recorded which are today rare or very rare in southern Sweden. This is a strong indication that they once were more common and widespread, perhaps due to a greater prevalence of their preferred habitats. Sweden’s earliest fossil bedbug is also amongst the finds. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Archaeoentomology, 17th century burial, Insects, Beetles, Acari (mites), Forensic entomology
in
Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
volume
31
article number
102299
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85082861792
ISSN
2352-409X
DOI
10.1016/j.jasrep.2020.102299
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27f5de2c-25bc-49a4-9ea6-083ba521b4b3
date added to LUP
2020-04-14 12:30:16
date last changed
2020-04-22 05:54:35
@article{27f5de2c-25bc-49a4-9ea6-083ba521b4b3,
  abstract     = {An extraordinarily diverse and well-preserved material, including the remains of 47 insect taxa and 12 taxa of other invertebrates, extracted from the 17th century burial of Bishop Peder Winstrup in Lund Minster, is presented and discussed in terms of the treatment of the body, activities connected with the burial and faunal significance. The invertebrate assemblages include species from gardens, insects feeding on living plants as well as dried or decaying plant matter. Many of the species are regarded as closely associated with humans (synanthropic), and a number of these are associated with outbuildings, such as stables and cellars. The absence of species associated with cadavers (necrophilous taxa) in the studied insect material is significant. The most plausible explanation is that the bishop died, and was buried during the winter, when such species are inactive, and thus precluded from colonising the body. A number of species were recorded which are today rare or very rare in southern Sweden. This is a strong indication that they once were more common and widespread, perhaps due to a greater prevalence of their preferred habitats. Sweden’s earliest fossil bedbug is also amongst the finds.},
  author       = {Fägerström, Christoffer and Buckland, Philip and Lemdahl, Geoffrey and Karsten, Per and Lagerås, Per and Manhag, Andreas},
  issn         = {2352-409X},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports},
  title        = {Insects and other invertebrate remains from the coffin of a 17th century bishop in Lund Minster, S Sweden},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/78356779/1_s2.0_S2352409X20300900_main.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.jasrep.2020.102299},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2020},
}