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Irrigation of landfill leachates in energy forests - A technique to recover nutrients from municipal solid wastes

Brander, Lars LU ; Dahl, Martin LU and Bramryd, Torleif LU (2004) In Water, Air and Soil Pollution 154(1-4). p.213-224
Abstract
From an ecological point of view it is important to close nutrient cycles by recirculating mineral nutrients from the urban society back to agriculture and forestry, and thereby obtaining a sustainable resource utilisation. A part of this cycle is illustrated by irrigation of bioreactor landfill leachates on short rotation forests. This paper presents a budget for nutrients and heavy metals, beginning with the leachates and ending with the harvested tree fraction. The hypotheses were: The applied minerals deliver nutrients to the trees. The nutrient content in the accumulating biomass corresponds to the amount of mineral nutrients applied. The concentrations of heavy metals in the trees will remain low. The uptake of elements in birch was... (More)
From an ecological point of view it is important to close nutrient cycles by recirculating mineral nutrients from the urban society back to agriculture and forestry, and thereby obtaining a sustainable resource utilisation. A part of this cycle is illustrated by irrigation of bioreactor landfill leachates on short rotation forests. This paper presents a budget for nutrients and heavy metals, beginning with the leachates and ending with the harvested tree fraction. The hypotheses were: The applied minerals deliver nutrients to the trees. The nutrient content in the accumulating biomass corresponds to the amount of mineral nutrients applied. The concentrations of heavy metals in the trees will remain low. The uptake of elements in birch was for P 35%, Ca 1.2%, Cd 64%, Cu 10%, Mn 19%, Ni 0.11%, and for Zn 26% of the supplied amounts. It was concluded that nutrients, with some exceptions, are supplied in sufficient amounts from the irrigated leachates to achieve optimal biomass growth, that the amounts of ions immobilised by the plants were significantly lower compared to the applied amounts, and that the concentrations of heavy metals are not increasing in the trees after irrigation. The overall conclusion is that a leachate irrigation system is efficient if the available vegetated land area is large enough for effective nutrient uptake, but the nutrient ratio may need to be balanced to meet the needs of the plants. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
leachate, nutrient, landfill, irrigation, heavy metal, Betula, birch
in
Water, Air and Soil Pollution
volume
154
issue
1-4
pages
213 - 224
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000220674700016
  • scopus:4944245706
ISSN
1573-2932
DOI
10.1023/B:WATE.0000022966.31465.d0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2b359494-decf-47ab-949e-77542729f393 (old id 281991)
date added to LUP
2007-10-17 11:35:40
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:08:51
@article{2b359494-decf-47ab-949e-77542729f393,
  abstract     = {From an ecological point of view it is important to close nutrient cycles by recirculating mineral nutrients from the urban society back to agriculture and forestry, and thereby obtaining a sustainable resource utilisation. A part of this cycle is illustrated by irrigation of bioreactor landfill leachates on short rotation forests. This paper presents a budget for nutrients and heavy metals, beginning with the leachates and ending with the harvested tree fraction. The hypotheses were: The applied minerals deliver nutrients to the trees. The nutrient content in the accumulating biomass corresponds to the amount of mineral nutrients applied. The concentrations of heavy metals in the trees will remain low. The uptake of elements in birch was for P 35%, Ca 1.2%, Cd 64%, Cu 10%, Mn 19%, Ni 0.11%, and for Zn 26% of the supplied amounts. It was concluded that nutrients, with some exceptions, are supplied in sufficient amounts from the irrigated leachates to achieve optimal biomass growth, that the amounts of ions immobilised by the plants were significantly lower compared to the applied amounts, and that the concentrations of heavy metals are not increasing in the trees after irrigation. The overall conclusion is that a leachate irrigation system is efficient if the available vegetated land area is large enough for effective nutrient uptake, but the nutrient ratio may need to be balanced to meet the needs of the plants.},
  author       = {Brander, Lars and Dahl, Martin and Bramryd, Torleif},
  issn         = {1573-2932},
  keyword      = {leachate,nutrient,landfill,irrigation,heavy metal,Betula,birch},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {213--224},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Water, Air and Soil Pollution},
  title        = {Irrigation of landfill leachates in energy forests - A technique to recover nutrients from municipal solid wastes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:WATE.0000022966.31465.d0},
  volume       = {154},
  year         = {2004},
}