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Risk of lung cancer by histology among immigrants to Sweden

Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2012) In Lung Cancer 76(2). p.159-164
Abstract
Background: We wanted to define lung cancer incidence rates by histological subtype among immigrants in Sweden to explore the effect of new environments on the incidence of lung cancer by histological subtype in different ethnic populations. Methods: The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database w used to calculate age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) (per 100,000) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). The patient series covered 19,255 male and 14,601 female Swedes, and 3236 male and 1751 female immigrants. Results: By time since immigration, Former Yugoslavian (ASR = 46.4) and Asian Arab (38.8) men, and Danish (23.3), Norwegian (19.5) and Finnish (14.5) women had the highest rates for lung cancer, while the lowest rate was seen... (More)
Background: We wanted to define lung cancer incidence rates by histological subtype among immigrants in Sweden to explore the effect of new environments on the incidence of lung cancer by histological subtype in different ethnic populations. Methods: The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database w used to calculate age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) (per 100,000) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). The patient series covered 19,255 male and 14,601 female Swedes, and 3236 male and 1751 female immigrants. Results: By time since immigration, Former Yugoslavian (ASR = 46.4) and Asian Arab (38.8) men, and Danish (23.3), Norwegian (19.5) and Finnish (14.5) women had the highest rates for lung cancer, while the lowest rate was seen among Asian Arab women (5.8). The highest adenocarcinoma rates were seen among South European men (11.5), and Danish (7.4) and Norwegian (6.9) women, while squamous cell (SCC) and small cell carcinomas rates were the highest among former Yugoslavian (16.0) and Baltic (8.8) men, respectively. Former Yugoslavian men (2.6) had the highest rate for large cell carcinoma. Compared to Swedes, former Yugoslavian men had the highest significant risk for SCC (SIR = 3.62), small cell (3.14) and large cell (4.21) carcinomas, whereas the highest adenocarcinoma risk was seen among Asian Arabs (2.35). Danish women had the highest risks for SCC (1.91) and small cell carcinoma (2.56). Conclusion: The ethnic-specific lung cancer rates by histology followed the rates in the countries of origin. Our findings may suggest that preservation of smoking habits in the host country is linked to the ethnic diversity of lung cancer incidence by histology. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adenocarcinoma, Cancer, Immigrants, Incidence, Large cell, Lung, Small, cell, Squamous cell, Sweden
in
Lung Cancer
volume
76
issue
2
pages
159 - 164
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000303620000005
  • scopus:84859430334
ISSN
1872-8332
DOI
10.1016/j.lungcan.2011.10.022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
779bc781-dab2-4540-bb10-96e4919f93e1 (old id 2826777)
date added to LUP
2012-07-03 10:25:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:30:47
@article{779bc781-dab2-4540-bb10-96e4919f93e1,
  abstract     = {Background: We wanted to define lung cancer incidence rates by histological subtype among immigrants in Sweden to explore the effect of new environments on the incidence of lung cancer by histological subtype in different ethnic populations. Methods: The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database w used to calculate age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) (per 100,000) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). The patient series covered 19,255 male and 14,601 female Swedes, and 3236 male and 1751 female immigrants. Results: By time since immigration, Former Yugoslavian (ASR = 46.4) and Asian Arab (38.8) men, and Danish (23.3), Norwegian (19.5) and Finnish (14.5) women had the highest rates for lung cancer, while the lowest rate was seen among Asian Arab women (5.8). The highest adenocarcinoma rates were seen among South European men (11.5), and Danish (7.4) and Norwegian (6.9) women, while squamous cell (SCC) and small cell carcinomas rates were the highest among former Yugoslavian (16.0) and Baltic (8.8) men, respectively. Former Yugoslavian men (2.6) had the highest rate for large cell carcinoma. Compared to Swedes, former Yugoslavian men had the highest significant risk for SCC (SIR = 3.62), small cell (3.14) and large cell (4.21) carcinomas, whereas the highest adenocarcinoma risk was seen among Asian Arabs (2.35). Danish women had the highest risks for SCC (1.91) and small cell carcinoma (2.56). Conclusion: The ethnic-specific lung cancer rates by histology followed the rates in the countries of origin. Our findings may suggest that preservation of smoking habits in the host country is linked to the ethnic diversity of lung cancer incidence by histology. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen and Sundquist, Kristina and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1872-8332},
  keyword      = {Adenocarcinoma,Cancer,Immigrants,Incidence,Large cell,Lung,Small,cell,Squamous cell,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {159--164},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Lung Cancer},
  title        = {Risk of lung cancer by histology among immigrants to Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2011.10.022},
  volume       = {76},
  year         = {2012},
}