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Intraperitoneal cytokine response after major surgery: higher postoperative intraperitoneal versus systemic cytokine levels suggest the gastrointestinal tract as the major source of the postoperative inflammatory reaction

Jansson, K; Redler, B; Truedsson, Lennart LU ; Magnuson, A; Matthiessen, P; Andersson, M and Norgren, L (2004) In American Journal of Surgery 187(3). p.372-377
Abstract
Background: Cytokine response is an important factor in the development of shock and organ failure. The aim of this study was to investigate intraperitoneal (peritoneal) and venous (systemic) postoperative cytokine release after major surgery. Methods: Major abdominal surgery was performed in 19 patients. Preoperative systemic measurements and postoperative systemic and peritoneal measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL-6), and IL-10 were performed. Results: Significantly higher TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 peritoneal values were recorded compared with systemic values, whereas peritoneal CRP was significantly decreased. CRP increased significantly over time, whereas... (More)
Background: Cytokine response is an important factor in the development of shock and organ failure. The aim of this study was to investigate intraperitoneal (peritoneal) and venous (systemic) postoperative cytokine release after major surgery. Methods: Major abdominal surgery was performed in 19 patients. Preoperative systemic measurements and postoperative systemic and peritoneal measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL-6), and IL-10 were performed. Results: Significantly higher TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 peritoneal values were recorded compared with systemic values, whereas peritoneal CRP was significantly decreased. CRP increased significantly over time, whereas postoperative values of IL-6, IL-10, and peritoneal TNF-alpha decreased. Systemic TNF-alpha was constant over time, but values after emergent abdominal surgery showed a more extensive response. An additional effect of surgery and emergent abdominal disease was seen in increased TNF-alpha and IL-10 levels. Conclusions: Compared with systemic cytokines, peritoneal cytokines respond extensively after major surgery, indicating that measurement of peritoneal cytokines is a more sensible method to determine postoperative inflammatory reaction. A normal postoperative course is characterized by decreasing levels of peritoneal cytokines. (C) 2004 Excerpta Medica, Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
surgery, major, intraperitoneal cytokines, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha
in
American Journal of Surgery
volume
187
issue
3
pages
372 - 377
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:15006565
  • wos:000220107700009
  • scopus:1542284684
ISSN
1879-1883
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2003.12.019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ee13de7-0b29-40c9-b07e-d14dae029880 (old id 285678)
date added to LUP
2007-10-23 11:16:22
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:46:23
@article{7ee13de7-0b29-40c9-b07e-d14dae029880,
  abstract     = {Background: Cytokine response is an important factor in the development of shock and organ failure. The aim of this study was to investigate intraperitoneal (peritoneal) and venous (systemic) postoperative cytokine release after major surgery. Methods: Major abdominal surgery was performed in 19 patients. Preoperative systemic measurements and postoperative systemic and peritoneal measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL-6), and IL-10 were performed. Results: Significantly higher TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 peritoneal values were recorded compared with systemic values, whereas peritoneal CRP was significantly decreased. CRP increased significantly over time, whereas postoperative values of IL-6, IL-10, and peritoneal TNF-alpha decreased. Systemic TNF-alpha was constant over time, but values after emergent abdominal surgery showed a more extensive response. An additional effect of surgery and emergent abdominal disease was seen in increased TNF-alpha and IL-10 levels. Conclusions: Compared with systemic cytokines, peritoneal cytokines respond extensively after major surgery, indicating that measurement of peritoneal cytokines is a more sensible method to determine postoperative inflammatory reaction. A normal postoperative course is characterized by decreasing levels of peritoneal cytokines. (C) 2004 Excerpta Medica, Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Jansson, K and Redler, B and Truedsson, Lennart and Magnuson, A and Matthiessen, P and Andersson, M and Norgren, L},
  issn         = {1879-1883},
  keyword      = {surgery,major,intraperitoneal cytokines,interleukin-6,interleukin-10,tumor necrosis factor-alpha},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {372--377},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {American Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Intraperitoneal cytokine response after major surgery: higher postoperative intraperitoneal versus systemic cytokine levels suggest the gastrointestinal tract as the major source of the postoperative inflammatory reaction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2003.12.019},
  volume       = {187},
  year         = {2004},
}