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Visual ecology and functional morphology of Cubozoa (Cnidaria)

Coates, Melissa LU (2003) In Integrative and Comparative Biology 43(4). p.542-548
Abstract
Jellyfish belong to one of the oldest extant animal phyla, the Cnidaria. The first Cnidaria appear in the fossil record 600 million years ago, preceeding the Cambrian explosion. They are an extremely successful group present in all marine environments and some freshwater environments. In contrast to many animal phyla in which vision is a primary sense Cnidarians do not, generally, employ image forming eyes. One small class stands alone: the Cubozoa. Cubomedusae are commonly known as box jellyfish. They possess image forming eyes (Coates et al., 2001) which certainly evolved independently from other metazoans. Cubomedusae therefore offer a unique perspective on the evolution of image forming eyes. This literature review collects, into one... (More)
Jellyfish belong to one of the oldest extant animal phyla, the Cnidaria. The first Cnidaria appear in the fossil record 600 million years ago, preceeding the Cambrian explosion. They are an extremely successful group present in all marine environments and some freshwater environments. In contrast to many animal phyla in which vision is a primary sense Cnidarians do not, generally, employ image forming eyes. One small class stands alone: the Cubozoa. Cubomedusae are commonly known as box jellyfish. They possess image forming eyes (Coates et al., 2001) which certainly evolved independently from other metazoans. Cubomedusae therefore offer a unique perspective on the evolution of image forming eyes. This literature review collects, into one place, what is known about: the multiple eye types of box jellyfish, cubomedusan life history and ecology, and the sensory and neural systems of box jellyfish. Here I discuss how these features set cubomedusae apart from scyphomedusae and hydromedusae. Knowledge in these areas is sparse; the work done to date inspires increased efforts. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Integrative and Comparative Biology
volume
43
issue
4
pages
542 - 548
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000189129400007
  • scopus:1542752264
ISSN
1557-7023
DOI
10.1093/icb/43.4.542
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bb1a835e-78d1-4336-8b45-4a23a80a5e14 (old id 286412)
date added to LUP
2007-08-28 09:55:54
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:46:40
@article{bb1a835e-78d1-4336-8b45-4a23a80a5e14,
  abstract     = {Jellyfish belong to one of the oldest extant animal phyla, the Cnidaria. The first Cnidaria appear in the fossil record 600 million years ago, preceeding the Cambrian explosion. They are an extremely successful group present in all marine environments and some freshwater environments. In contrast to many animal phyla in which vision is a primary sense Cnidarians do not, generally, employ image forming eyes. One small class stands alone: the Cubozoa. Cubomedusae are commonly known as box jellyfish. They possess image forming eyes (Coates et al., 2001) which certainly evolved independently from other metazoans. Cubomedusae therefore offer a unique perspective on the evolution of image forming eyes. This literature review collects, into one place, what is known about: the multiple eye types of box jellyfish, cubomedusan life history and ecology, and the sensory and neural systems of box jellyfish. Here I discuss how these features set cubomedusae apart from scyphomedusae and hydromedusae. Knowledge in these areas is sparse; the work done to date inspires increased efforts.},
  author       = {Coates, Melissa},
  issn         = {1557-7023},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {542--548},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Integrative and Comparative Biology},
  title        = {Visual ecology and functional morphology of Cubozoa (Cnidaria)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icb/43.4.542},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2003},
}