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Comparison between capillary, venous and arterial levels of protein S100B in patients with severe brain pathology

Åstrand, Ramona LU ; Romner, Bertil; Reinstrup, Peter LU ; Friis-Hansen, Lennart and Undén, Johan LU (2012) In Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 50(6). p.1055-1061
Abstract
Background: Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation between capillary, venous and arterial measurements of protein S100B, primarily by determining whether capillary S100B differ from venous and if capillary S100B can predict venous S100B levels, and secondarily, if arterial S100B samples can substitute venous samples in severely brain-injured patients. Methods: Venous, arterial and capillary blood samples for S100B were collected simultaneously once... (More)
Background: Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation between capillary, venous and arterial measurements of protein S100B, primarily by determining whether capillary S100B differ from venous and if capillary S100B can predict venous S100B levels, and secondarily, if arterial S100B samples can substitute venous samples in severely brain-injured patients. Methods: Venous, arterial and capillary blood samples for S100B were collected simultaneously once a day for a maximum of 6 days. Patients were >= 18 years old and admitted to neurointensive care due to severe brain pathology. Results: Capillary S100B samples were on average 0.08 mu g/L higher than venous S100B samples. Prediction of venous concentration from capillary samples yielded a prediction error of 0.07 mu g/L. The mean difference between venous and arterial samples was 0.01 mu g/L. The mean prediction error was 0.03 mu g/L. Conclusions: Capillary and venous serum S100B are not interchangeable, and should be considered as two separate, although related, variables. Arterial measurements of S100B can successfully predict the corresponding venous concentration. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
arterial measurements, capillary, protein S100B, severe brain injury, venous
in
Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
volume
50
issue
6
pages
1055 - 1061
publisher
De Gruyter
external identifiers
  • wos:000305631600014
  • scopus:84867418005
ISSN
1434-6621
DOI
10.1515/cclm-2011-0639
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
abd42ded-3fb9-4ab2-bdd7-cfcbc140c0e0 (old id 2890549)
date added to LUP
2012-08-01 08:56:59
date last changed
2017-01-29 03:04:07
@article{abd42ded-3fb9-4ab2-bdd7-cfcbc140c0e0,
  abstract     = {Background: Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation between capillary, venous and arterial measurements of protein S100B, primarily by determining whether capillary S100B differ from venous and if capillary S100B can predict venous S100B levels, and secondarily, if arterial S100B samples can substitute venous samples in severely brain-injured patients. Methods: Venous, arterial and capillary blood samples for S100B were collected simultaneously once a day for a maximum of 6 days. Patients were >= 18 years old and admitted to neurointensive care due to severe brain pathology. Results: Capillary S100B samples were on average 0.08 mu g/L higher than venous S100B samples. Prediction of venous concentration from capillary samples yielded a prediction error of 0.07 mu g/L. The mean difference between venous and arterial samples was 0.01 mu g/L. The mean prediction error was 0.03 mu g/L. Conclusions: Capillary and venous serum S100B are not interchangeable, and should be considered as two separate, although related, variables. Arterial measurements of S100B can successfully predict the corresponding venous concentration.},
  author       = {Åstrand, Ramona and Romner, Bertil and Reinstrup, Peter and Friis-Hansen, Lennart and Undén, Johan},
  issn         = {1434-6621},
  keyword      = {arterial measurements,capillary,protein S100B,severe brain injury,venous},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1055--1061},
  publisher    = {De Gruyter},
  series       = {Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine},
  title        = {Comparison between capillary, venous and arterial levels of protein S100B in patients with severe brain pathology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2011-0639},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2012},
}