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Frontiers in growth and remodeling

Menzel, Andreas LU and Kuhl, Ellen (2012) In Mechanics Research Communications 42. p.1-14
Abstract
Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth... (More)
Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Living matter, Density growth, Volumetric growth, Area growth, Functional adaptation, Remodeling
in
Mechanics Research Communications
volume
42
pages
1 - 14
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000304847400001
  • scopus:84860769985
ISSN
0093-6413
DOI
10.1016/j.mechrescom.2012.02.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c07be1cd-a192-4830-96a2-8ab34a8f99de (old id 2896953)
date added to LUP
2012-07-24 10:58:51
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:42:57
@article{c07be1cd-a192-4830-96a2-8ab34a8f99de,
  abstract     = {Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Menzel, Andreas and Kuhl, Ellen},
  issn         = {0093-6413},
  keyword      = {Living matter,Density growth,Volumetric growth,Area growth,Functional adaptation,Remodeling},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--14},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Mechanics Research Communications},
  title        = {Frontiers in growth and remodeling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mechrescom.2012.02.007},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2012},
}