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Hydration and Mobility of Trehalose in Aqueous Solution.

Winther, Louise Revsbech; Qvist, Johan LU and Halle, Bertil LU (2012) In The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B 116(30). p.9196-9207
Abstract
The disaccharide trehalose stabilizes proteins against unfolding, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because trehalose is preferentially excluded from the protein surface, it is of interest to examine how trehalose modifies the structure and dynamics of the solvent. From the spin relaxation rates of deuterated trehalose and (17)O-enriched water, we obtain the rotational dynamics of trehalose and water in solutions over wide ranges of concentration (0.025-1.5 M) and temperature (236-293 K). The results reveal direct solute-solute interactions at all concentrations, consistent with transient trehalose clusters. Similar to other organic solutes, the trehalose perturbation of water rotation (and hydrogen-bond exchange) is... (More)
The disaccharide trehalose stabilizes proteins against unfolding, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because trehalose is preferentially excluded from the protein surface, it is of interest to examine how trehalose modifies the structure and dynamics of the solvent. From the spin relaxation rates of deuterated trehalose and (17)O-enriched water, we obtain the rotational dynamics of trehalose and water in solutions over wide ranges of concentration (0.025-1.5 M) and temperature (236-293 K). The results reveal direct solute-solute interactions at all concentrations, consistent with transient trehalose clusters. Similar to other organic solutes, the trehalose perturbation of water rotation (and hydrogen-bond exchange) is modest: a factor 1.6 (at 298 K) on average for the 47 water molecules in the first hydration layer. The deviation of the solute tumbling time from the Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation is partly caused by a dynamic solvent effect that is often modeled by incorporating "bound water" in the hydrodynamic volume. By comparing the measured temperature dependences of trehalose and water dynamics, we demonstrate that a more realistic local viscosity model accounts for this second-order dynamic coupling. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B
volume
116
issue
30
pages
9196 - 9207
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000306989800050
  • pmid:22809015
  • scopus:84864749693
ISSN
1520-5207
DOI
10.1021/jp304982c
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac0087e1-5265-43c1-b2fd-9241acc28298 (old id 2966966)
date added to LUP
2012-09-03 12:58:59
date last changed
2017-09-03 04:21:18
@article{ac0087e1-5265-43c1-b2fd-9241acc28298,
  abstract     = {The disaccharide trehalose stabilizes proteins against unfolding, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because trehalose is preferentially excluded from the protein surface, it is of interest to examine how trehalose modifies the structure and dynamics of the solvent. From the spin relaxation rates of deuterated trehalose and (17)O-enriched water, we obtain the rotational dynamics of trehalose and water in solutions over wide ranges of concentration (0.025-1.5 M) and temperature (236-293 K). The results reveal direct solute-solute interactions at all concentrations, consistent with transient trehalose clusters. Similar to other organic solutes, the trehalose perturbation of water rotation (and hydrogen-bond exchange) is modest: a factor 1.6 (at 298 K) on average for the 47 water molecules in the first hydration layer. The deviation of the solute tumbling time from the Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation is partly caused by a dynamic solvent effect that is often modeled by incorporating "bound water" in the hydrodynamic volume. By comparing the measured temperature dependences of trehalose and water dynamics, we demonstrate that a more realistic local viscosity model accounts for this second-order dynamic coupling.},
  author       = {Winther, Louise Revsbech and Qvist, Johan and Halle, Bertil},
  issn         = {1520-5207},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {30},
  pages        = {9196--9207},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part B},
  title        = {Hydration and Mobility of Trehalose in Aqueous Solution.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp304982c},
  volume       = {116},
  year         = {2012},
}