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The fragrance hand immersion study - an experimental model simulating real-life exposure for allergic contact dermatitis on the hands

Heydorn, S; Menne, T; Andersen, KE; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Svedman, Cecilia LU ; Basketter, D and Johansen, JD (2003) In Contact Dermatitis 48(6). p.324-330
Abstract
Recently, we showed that 10.2% of consecutively patch-tested hand eczema patients had a positive patch test to a selection of fragrances containing fragrances relevant to hand exposure. In this study, we used repeated skin exposure to a patch test-positive fragrance allergen in patients previously diagnosed with hand eczema to explore whether immersion of fingers in a solution with or without the patch-test-positive fragrance allergen would cause or exacerbate hand eczema on the exposed finger. The study was double blinded and randomized. All participants had a positive patch test to either hydroxycitronellal or Lyral(R) (hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde). Each participant immersed a finger from each hand, once a day, in a... (More)
Recently, we showed that 10.2% of consecutively patch-tested hand eczema patients had a positive patch test to a selection of fragrances containing fragrances relevant to hand exposure. In this study, we used repeated skin exposure to a patch test-positive fragrance allergen in patients previously diagnosed with hand eczema to explore whether immersion of fingers in a solution with or without the patch-test-positive fragrance allergen would cause or exacerbate hand eczema on the exposed finger. The study was double blinded and randomized. All participants had a positive patch test to either hydroxycitronellal or Lyral(R) (hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde). Each participant immersed a finger from each hand, once a day, in a solution containing the fragrance allergen or placebo. During the first 2 weeks, the concentration of fragrance allergen in the solution was low (approximately 10 p.p.m.), whilst during the following 2 weeks, the concentration was relatively high (approximately 250 p.p.m.), imitating real-life exposure to a household product like dishwashing liquid diluted in water and the undiluted product, respectively. Evaluation was made using a clinical scale and laser Doppler flow meter. 3 of 15 hand eczema patients developed eczema on the finger immersed in the fragrance-containing solution, 3 of 15 on the placebo finger and 3 of 15 on both fingers. Using this experimental exposure model simulating real-fife exposure, we found no association between immersion of a finger in a solution containing fragrance and development of clinically visible eczema on the finger in 15 participants previously diagnosed with hand eczema and with a positive patch test to the fragrance in question. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
carboxaldehyde, 3-cyclohexene, hydroxyisohexyl, hydroxycitronellal, fragrance allergy, hand eczema, repeated skin exposure, Lyral (R)
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
48
issue
6
pages
324 - 330
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000186231100006
  • pmid:14531871
  • scopus:0142257910
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1034/j.1600-0536.2003.00145.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26947699-c821-4040-b848-e956482a93fa (old id 297302)
date added to LUP
2007-09-13 08:39:24
date last changed
2018-06-24 03:42:51
@article{26947699-c821-4040-b848-e956482a93fa,
  abstract     = {Recently, we showed that 10.2% of consecutively patch-tested hand eczema patients had a positive patch test to a selection of fragrances containing fragrances relevant to hand exposure. In this study, we used repeated skin exposure to a patch test-positive fragrance allergen in patients previously diagnosed with hand eczema to explore whether immersion of fingers in a solution with or without the patch-test-positive fragrance allergen would cause or exacerbate hand eczema on the exposed finger. The study was double blinded and randomized. All participants had a positive patch test to either hydroxycitronellal or Lyral(R) (hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde). Each participant immersed a finger from each hand, once a day, in a solution containing the fragrance allergen or placebo. During the first 2 weeks, the concentration of fragrance allergen in the solution was low (approximately 10 p.p.m.), whilst during the following 2 weeks, the concentration was relatively high (approximately 250 p.p.m.), imitating real-life exposure to a household product like dishwashing liquid diluted in water and the undiluted product, respectively. Evaluation was made using a clinical scale and laser Doppler flow meter. 3 of 15 hand eczema patients developed eczema on the finger immersed in the fragrance-containing solution, 3 of 15 on the placebo finger and 3 of 15 on both fingers. Using this experimental exposure model simulating real-fife exposure, we found no association between immersion of a finger in a solution containing fragrance and development of clinically visible eczema on the finger in 15 participants previously diagnosed with hand eczema and with a positive patch test to the fragrance in question.},
  author       = {Heydorn, S and Menne, T and Andersen, KE and Bruze, Magnus and Svedman, Cecilia and Basketter, D and Johansen, JD},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {carboxaldehyde,3-cyclohexene,hydroxyisohexyl,hydroxycitronellal,fragrance allergy,hand eczema,repeated skin exposure,Lyral (R)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {324--330},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {The fragrance hand immersion study - an experimental model simulating real-life exposure for allergic contact dermatitis on the hands},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0536.2003.00145.x},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2003},
}