Advanced

Familial risks of second primary cancers and mortality in ovarian cancer patients

Zheng, Guoqiao LU ; Chattopadhyay, Subhayan LU ; Försti, Asta LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2018) In Clinical Epidemiology 10. p.1457-1466
Abstract

Background: With improving survival in ovarian cancer, second primary cancers (SPCs) and their etiological foundations are becoming an issue. The ways in which family history may influence the occurrence of SPCs and the related mortality are not well known. Methods: Based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 11,300 ovarian cancer patients and followed them for diagnoses of SPCs until the end of 2015. Relative risks (RRs) of SPC in patients who had parents or siblings diagnosed with the same cancer (positive family history) were compared to those in patients without a family history (negative family history). Causes of death were compared between patients with and without SPC. Results: A total of 1,111 (9.8%) ovarian... (More)

Background: With improving survival in ovarian cancer, second primary cancers (SPCs) and their etiological foundations are becoming an issue. The ways in which family history may influence the occurrence of SPCs and the related mortality are not well known. Methods: Based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 11,300 ovarian cancer patients and followed them for diagnoses of SPCs until the end of 2015. Relative risks (RRs) of SPC in patients who had parents or siblings diagnosed with the same cancer (positive family history) were compared to those in patients without a family history (negative family history). Causes of death were compared between patients with and without SPC. Results: A total of 1,111 (9.8%) ovarian cancer patients developed SPC with a median follow-up of 8 years. The impact of a family history of cancer on the risk of the same cancer as SPC was significant for colon (RRpositive family history [95% CI] vs RRnegative family history [95% CI]: 4.95 [3.03–8.09] vs 2.00 [1.63–2.47]), lung (3.32 [1.88–5.84] vs 1.45 [1.16–1.83]), and breast (2.08 [1.58–2.73] vs 1.01 [0.88–1.15]) cancers. With a family history of any cancer, the RR for non-ovarian SPCs was 1.66 (1.54–1.74), in contrast to 1.38 (1.24–1.54) for SPCs without any family history (P-trend <0.001). Accounting for 42.1% of all deaths, SPC was found to be the main cause of death for patients with SPC. Conclusion: A family history of a particular cancer contributed to an increased risk of SPC at the same site. Therefore, considering family history at the time of diagnosis of ovarian cancer may alert physicians to a syndromic background, management of which may help the patient and her family members.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cause of death, Cumulative incidence, Familial cancer, Second primary cancer
in
Clinical Epidemiology
volume
10
pages
10 pages
publisher
Dove Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85057762730
ISSN
1179-1349
DOI
10.2147/CLEP.S174173
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2980e2cb-a499-4327-bc7b-55cb4f7fbf36
date added to LUP
2018-12-21 14:05:55
date last changed
2019-08-25 05:10:04
@article{2980e2cb-a499-4327-bc7b-55cb4f7fbf36,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: With improving survival in ovarian cancer, second primary cancers (SPCs) and their etiological foundations are becoming an issue. The ways in which family history may influence the occurrence of SPCs and the related mortality are not well known. Methods: Based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 11,300 ovarian cancer patients and followed them for diagnoses of SPCs until the end of 2015. Relative risks (RRs) of SPC in patients who had parents or siblings diagnosed with the same cancer (positive family history) were compared to those in patients without a family history (negative family history). Causes of death were compared between patients with and without SPC. Results: A total of 1,111 (9.8%) ovarian cancer patients developed SPC with a median follow-up of 8 years. The impact of a family history of cancer on the risk of the same cancer as SPC was significant for colon (RRpositive family history [95% CI] vs RRnegative family history [95% CI]: 4.95 [3.03–8.09] vs 2.00 [1.63–2.47]), lung (3.32 [1.88–5.84] vs 1.45 [1.16–1.83]), and breast (2.08 [1.58–2.73] vs 1.01 [0.88–1.15]) cancers. With a family history of any cancer, the RR for non-ovarian SPCs was 1.66 (1.54–1.74), in contrast to 1.38 (1.24–1.54) for SPCs without any family history (P-trend &lt;0.001). Accounting for 42.1% of all deaths, SPC was found to be the main cause of death for patients with SPC. Conclusion: A family history of a particular cancer contributed to an increased risk of SPC at the same site. Therefore, considering family history at the time of diagnosis of ovarian cancer may alert physicians to a syndromic background, management of which may help the patient and her family members.</p>},
  author       = {Zheng, Guoqiao and Chattopadhyay, Subhayan and Försti, Asta and Sundquist, Kristina and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1179-1349},
  keyword      = {Cause of death,Cumulative incidence,Familial cancer,Second primary cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1457--1466},
  publisher    = {Dove Press},
  series       = {Clinical Epidemiology},
  title        = {Familial risks of second primary cancers and mortality in ovarian cancer patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S174173},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2018},
}