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Quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others

Laplante-Levesque, Ariane; Brännström, Jonas LU ; Andersson, Gerhard and Lunner, Thomas (2012) In International Journal of Audiology 51(8). p.618-626
Abstract
Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, non-profit organization, or government), date of last update, quality (Health On the Net (HON) certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure Of... (More)
Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, non-profit organization, or government), date of last update, quality (Health On the Net (HON) certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure Of Gobbledygook) were assessed. Results: Most websites were of commercial origin and had been updated within the last 18 months. Their quality and readability was highly variable. Only 14% of the websites had HON certification. Websites that were of non-profit organization origin had significantly higher DISCERN scores. Readability measures show that on average, only people with at least 11-12 years of education could read and understand the internet information presented. Conclusions: Based on these results, this article provides a list of recommendations for website developers and clinicians wishing to incorporate internet information into their practice. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Hearing impairment, hearing aids, internet health information, health, information quality, health information readability
in
International Journal of Audiology
volume
51
issue
8
pages
618 - 626
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000306425600008
  • scopus:84863917143
ISSN
1708-8186
DOI
10.3109/14992027.2012.684406
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7dda8fa1-f9ce-4418-9020-3d35e47b808f (old id 2991570)
date added to LUP
2012-09-03 07:16:42
date last changed
2017-04-09 03:18:46
@article{7dda8fa1-f9ce-4418-9020-3d35e47b808f,
  abstract     = {Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, non-profit organization, or government), date of last update, quality (Health On the Net (HON) certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure Of Gobbledygook) were assessed. Results: Most websites were of commercial origin and had been updated within the last 18 months. Their quality and readability was highly variable. Only 14% of the websites had HON certification. Websites that were of non-profit organization origin had significantly higher DISCERN scores. Readability measures show that on average, only people with at least 11-12 years of education could read and understand the internet information presented. Conclusions: Based on these results, this article provides a list of recommendations for website developers and clinicians wishing to incorporate internet information into their practice.},
  author       = {Laplante-Levesque, Ariane and Brännström, Jonas and Andersson, Gerhard and Lunner, Thomas},
  issn         = {1708-8186},
  keyword      = {Hearing impairment,hearing aids,internet health information,health,information quality,health information readability},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {618--626},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Audiology},
  title        = {Quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2012.684406},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2012},
}