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Object caching in corvids: Incidence and significance.

Jacobs, Ivo LU ; Osvath, Mathias LU ; Osvath, Helena LU ; Mioduszewska, Berenika; von Bayern, Auguste M P and Kacelnik, Alex (2014) In Behavioural Processes 102. p.25-32
Abstract
Food caching is a paramount model for studying relations between cognition, brain organisation and ecology in corvids. In contrast, behaviour towards inedible objects is poorly examined and understood. We review the literature on object caching in corvids and other birds, and describe an exploratory study on object caching in ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws. The captive adult birds were presented with an identical set of novel objects adjacent to food. All three species cached objects, which shows the behaviour not to be restricted to juveniles, food cachers, tool-users or individuals deprived of cacheable food. The pattern of object interaction and caching did not mirror the incidence of food caching: the intensely food caching... (More)
Food caching is a paramount model for studying relations between cognition, brain organisation and ecology in corvids. In contrast, behaviour towards inedible objects is poorly examined and understood. We review the literature on object caching in corvids and other birds, and describe an exploratory study on object caching in ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws. The captive adult birds were presented with an identical set of novel objects adjacent to food. All three species cached objects, which shows the behaviour not to be restricted to juveniles, food cachers, tool-users or individuals deprived of cacheable food. The pattern of object interaction and caching did not mirror the incidence of food caching: the intensely food caching ravens indeed showed highest object caching incidence, but the rarely food caching jackdaws cached objects to similar extent as the moderate food caching New Caledonian crows. Ravens and jackdaws preferred objects with greater sphericity, but New Caledonian crows preferred stick-like objects (similar to tools). We suggest that the observed object caching might have been expressions of exploration or play, and deserves being studied in its own right because of its potential significance for tool-related behaviour and learning, rather than as an over-spill from food-caching research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CO3 2013. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Corvids, object caching, food caching, exploration, play
in
Behavioural Processes
volume
102
pages
25 - 32
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:24333834
  • wos:000334086300005
  • scopus:84896698577
ISSN
0376-6357
DOI
10.1016/j.beproc.2013.12.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2b285814-a112-4eb4-9475-c9ee62e6675b (old id 4223810)
date added to LUP
2014-01-10 14:15:49
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:27:29
@article{2b285814-a112-4eb4-9475-c9ee62e6675b,
  abstract     = {Food caching is a paramount model for studying relations between cognition, brain organisation and ecology in corvids. In contrast, behaviour towards inedible objects is poorly examined and understood. We review the literature on object caching in corvids and other birds, and describe an exploratory study on object caching in ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws. The captive adult birds were presented with an identical set of novel objects adjacent to food. All three species cached objects, which shows the behaviour not to be restricted to juveniles, food cachers, tool-users or individuals deprived of cacheable food. The pattern of object interaction and caching did not mirror the incidence of food caching: the intensely food caching ravens indeed showed highest object caching incidence, but the rarely food caching jackdaws cached objects to similar extent as the moderate food caching New Caledonian crows. Ravens and jackdaws preferred objects with greater sphericity, but New Caledonian crows preferred stick-like objects (similar to tools). We suggest that the observed object caching might have been expressions of exploration or play, and deserves being studied in its own right because of its potential significance for tool-related behaviour and learning, rather than as an over-spill from food-caching research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CO3 2013.},
  author       = {Jacobs, Ivo and Osvath, Mathias and Osvath, Helena and Mioduszewska, Berenika and von Bayern, Auguste M P and Kacelnik, Alex},
  issn         = {0376-6357},
  keyword      = {Corvids,object caching,food caching,exploration,play},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {25--32},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Behavioural Processes},
  title        = {Object caching in corvids: Incidence and significance.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2013.12.003},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2014},
}