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First Genome-Wide Association Study of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults Reveals Novel Insights Linking Immune and Metabolic Diabetes

Cousminer, Diana L ; Ahlqvist, Emma LU ; Åkerlund, Mikael LU ; Melander, Olle LU ; Voight, Benjamin F LU ; Tuomi, Tiinamaija LU ; Groop, Leif LU ; Leslie, R. David and Grant, Struan F A (2018) In Diabetes Care 41(11). p.2396-2403
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) shares clinical features with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes; however, there is ongoing debate regarding the precise definition of LADA. Understanding its genetic basis is one potential strategy to gain insight into appropriate classification of this diabetes subtype.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed the first genome-wide association study of LADA in case subjects of European ancestry versus population control subjects (n = 2,634 vs. 5,947) and compared against both case subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 2,454 vs. 968) and type 2 diabetes (n = 2,779 vs. 10,396).

RESULTS: The leading genetic signals were principally shared with type 1 diabetes, although we... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) shares clinical features with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes; however, there is ongoing debate regarding the precise definition of LADA. Understanding its genetic basis is one potential strategy to gain insight into appropriate classification of this diabetes subtype.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed the first genome-wide association study of LADA in case subjects of European ancestry versus population control subjects (n = 2,634 vs. 5,947) and compared against both case subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 2,454 vs. 968) and type 2 diabetes (n = 2,779 vs. 10,396).

RESULTS: The leading genetic signals were principally shared with type 1 diabetes, although we observed positive genetic correlations genome-wide with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, we observed a novel independent signal at the known type 1 diabetes locus harboring PFKFB3, encoding a regulator of glycolysis and insulin signaling in type 2 diabetes and inflammation and autophagy in autoimmune disease, as well as an attenuation of key type 1-associated HLA haplotype frequencies in LADA, suggesting that these are factors that distinguish childhood-onset type 1 diabetes from adult autoimmune diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the need for further investigations of the genetic factors that distinguish forms of autoimmune diabetes as well as more precise classification strategies.

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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/genetics, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Glucose Intolerance/genetics, Haplotypes, Humans, Immune System Phenomena/genetics, Insulin/metabolism, Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults/genetics, Male, Middle Aged, Young Adult
in
Diabetes Care
volume
41
issue
11
pages
2396 - 2403
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055200340
  • pmid:30254083
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc18-1032
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
id
2c0a68de-7a5f-4688-99e7-e81d87bb4894
date added to LUP
2019-05-24 12:00:24
date last changed
2021-01-26 03:11:50
@article{2c0a68de-7a5f-4688-99e7-e81d87bb4894,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) shares clinical features with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes; however, there is ongoing debate regarding the precise definition of LADA. Understanding its genetic basis is one potential strategy to gain insight into appropriate classification of this diabetes subtype.</p><p>RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed the first genome-wide association study of LADA in case subjects of European ancestry versus population control subjects (n = 2,634 vs. 5,947) and compared against both case subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 2,454 vs. 968) and type 2 diabetes (n = 2,779 vs. 10,396).</p><p>RESULTS: The leading genetic signals were principally shared with type 1 diabetes, although we observed positive genetic correlations genome-wide with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, we observed a novel independent signal at the known type 1 diabetes locus harboring PFKFB3, encoding a regulator of glycolysis and insulin signaling in type 2 diabetes and inflammation and autophagy in autoimmune disease, as well as an attenuation of key type 1-associated HLA haplotype frequencies in LADA, suggesting that these are factors that distinguish childhood-onset type 1 diabetes from adult autoimmune diabetes.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the need for further investigations of the genetic factors that distinguish forms of autoimmune diabetes as well as more precise classification strategies.</p>},
  author       = {Cousminer, Diana L and Ahlqvist, Emma and Åkerlund, Mikael and Melander, Olle and Voight, Benjamin F and Tuomi, Tiinamaija and Groop, Leif and Leslie, R. David and Grant, Struan F A},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2396--2403},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {First Genome-Wide Association Study of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults Reveals Novel Insights Linking Immune and Metabolic Diabetes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc18-1032},
  doi          = {10.2337/dc18-1032},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2018},
}