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Attitudes and donation behavior toward positive and negative charity appeals

ERLANDSSON, ARVID LU ; Nilsson, Artur LU and Västfjäll, Daniel (2018) In Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing 30(4). p.444-474
Abstract
This article tries to clarify whether negative charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the bad consequences of not helping) or positive charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the good consequences of helping) are more effective. Previous literature does not provide a single answer to this question and we suggest that one contributing reason for this is that different studies have operationalized appeal effectiveness in different ways (e.g., actual behavior, self-rated helping intentions, or expressed attitudes about the ad or the organization). Results from four separate studies suggest that positive appeals are more effective in inducing favorable attitudes toward the ad and toward the organization but that negative... (More)
This article tries to clarify whether negative charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the bad consequences of not helping) or positive charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the good consequences of helping) are more effective. Previous literature does not provide a single answer to this question and we suggest that one contributing reason for this is that different studies have operationalized appeal effectiveness in different ways (e.g., actual behavior, self-rated helping intentions, or expressed attitudes about the ad or the organization). Results from four separate studies suggest that positive appeals are more effective in inducing favorable attitudes toward the ad and toward the organization but that negative appeals are more effective (in studies 1A and 1B) or at least equally effective (in studies 1C and 1D) in eliciting actual donations. Also, although people’s attitude toward the appeal (i.e., liking) was a good predictor for the expected effectiveness in increasing donation behavior (in Study 2), it was a poor predictor of actual donation behavior in all four main studies. These results cast doubt on marketing theories suggesting that attitudes toward an advertisement and toward the brand always lead to higher purchase behavior. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing
volume
30
issue
4
pages
444 - 474
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044780884
ISSN
1540-6997
DOI
10.1080/10495142.2018.1452828
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c5f47a8-a5a2-4384-ac85-53f6b55226b5
date added to LUP
2018-03-27 16:10:05
date last changed
2019-03-12 04:07:32
@article{2c5f47a8-a5a2-4384-ac85-53f6b55226b5,
  abstract     = {This article tries to clarify whether negative charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the bad consequences of not helping) or positive charity appeals (i.e., advertisements emphasizing the good consequences of helping) are more effective. Previous literature does not provide a single answer to this question and we suggest that one contributing reason for this is that different studies have operationalized appeal effectiveness in different ways (e.g., actual behavior, self-rated helping intentions, or expressed attitudes about the ad or the organization). Results from four separate studies suggest that positive appeals are more effective in inducing favorable attitudes toward the ad and toward the organization but that negative appeals are more effective (in studies 1A and 1B) or at least equally effective (in studies 1C and 1D) in eliciting actual donations. Also, although people’s attitude toward the appeal (i.e., liking) was a good predictor for the expected effectiveness in increasing donation behavior (in Study 2), it was a poor predictor of actual donation behavior in all four main studies. These results cast doubt on marketing theories suggesting that attitudes toward an advertisement and toward the brand always lead to higher purchase behavior.},
  author       = {ERLANDSSON, ARVID and Nilsson, Artur and Västfjäll, Daniel},
  issn         = {1540-6997},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {444--474},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing},
  title        = {Attitudes and donation behavior toward positive and negative charity appeals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10495142.2018.1452828},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2018},
}