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Possible roles of reactive chlorine II: assessing biotic chlorination as a way for organisms to handle oxygen stress.

Bengtson, Per LU ; Bastviken, David and Oberg, Gunilla (2013) In Environmental Microbiology 15(4). p.991-1000
Abstract
Natural formation of organically bound chlorine is extensive in many environments. The enzymes associated with the formation of chlorinated organic matter are produced by a large variety of organisms. Little is known about the ecological role of the process, the key question being: why do microorganisms promote chlorination of organic matter? In a recent paper we discuss whether organic matter chlorination may be a result of antagonistic interactions among microorganisms. In the present paper we evaluate whether extracellular microbial formation of reactive chlorine may be used as a defence against oxygen stress, and we discuss whether this process is likely to contribute to the formation of chlorinated organic matter. Our analysis... (More)
Natural formation of organically bound chlorine is extensive in many environments. The enzymes associated with the formation of chlorinated organic matter are produced by a large variety of organisms. Little is known about the ecological role of the process, the key question being: why do microorganisms promote chlorination of organic matter? In a recent paper we discuss whether organic matter chlorination may be a result of antagonistic interactions among microorganisms. In the present paper we evaluate whether extracellular microbial formation of reactive chlorine may be used as a defence against oxygen stress, and we discuss whether this process is likely to contribute to the formation of chlorinated organic matter. Our analysis suggests that periodic exposure to elevated concentrations of reactive oxygen species is a common denominator among the multitude of organisms that are able to enzymatically catalyse formation of reactive chlorine. There is also some evidence suggesting that the production of such enzymes in algae and bacteria is induced by oxygen stress. The relative contribution from this process to the extensive formation of chlorinated organic matter in natural environments remains to be empirically assessed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Environmental Microbiology
volume
15
issue
4
pages
991 - 1000
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000317287200002
  • pmid:22712445
  • scopus:84875909922
  • pmid:22712445
ISSN
1462-2920
DOI
10.1111/j.1462-2920.2012.02807.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c623d18-5f51-45ba-b941-828efa140998 (old id 2859253)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:00:56
date last changed
2020-01-12 06:39:36
@article{2c623d18-5f51-45ba-b941-828efa140998,
  abstract     = {Natural formation of organically bound chlorine is extensive in many environments. The enzymes associated with the formation of chlorinated organic matter are produced by a large variety of organisms. Little is known about the ecological role of the process, the key question being: why do microorganisms promote chlorination of organic matter? In a recent paper we discuss whether organic matter chlorination may be a result of antagonistic interactions among microorganisms. In the present paper we evaluate whether extracellular microbial formation of reactive chlorine may be used as a defence against oxygen stress, and we discuss whether this process is likely to contribute to the formation of chlorinated organic matter. Our analysis suggests that periodic exposure to elevated concentrations of reactive oxygen species is a common denominator among the multitude of organisms that are able to enzymatically catalyse formation of reactive chlorine. There is also some evidence suggesting that the production of such enzymes in algae and bacteria is induced by oxygen stress. The relative contribution from this process to the extensive formation of chlorinated organic matter in natural environments remains to be empirically assessed.},
  author       = {Bengtson, Per and Bastviken, David and Oberg, Gunilla},
  issn         = {1462-2920},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {991--1000},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Environmental Microbiology},
  title        = {Possible roles of reactive chlorine II: assessing biotic chlorination as a way for organisms to handle oxygen stress.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2012.02807.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1462-2920.2012.02807.x},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2013},
}