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Anti-inflammatory properties of micropatterned titanium coatings

Sahlin, Herman; Contreras, Ramiro; Gaskill, Daniel F; Bjursten, Lars Magnus LU and Frangos, John A (2006) In Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A 77A(1). p.43-49
Abstract
Prolonged inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated around an implanted biosensor are the primary causes of the foreign body response, including encapsulation of biosensor membranes. We have previously demonstrated that TiO2 surfaces reduce ROS. Here we investigated the potential of using the anti-inflammatory properties of TiO2 in the design of biosensor membranes with improved long-term in vivo transport properties. Micropatterned Ti films were sputtered onto quartz surfaces in a series of hexagonally distributed dots with identical coverage area of 23% and dot size ranging from 5 to 100 microm. The antioxidant effect of the surfaces was investigated using a cell-free peroxynitrite donor assay and assays of superoxide... (More)
Prolonged inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated around an implanted biosensor are the primary causes of the foreign body response, including encapsulation of biosensor membranes. We have previously demonstrated that TiO2 surfaces reduce ROS. Here we investigated the potential of using the anti-inflammatory properties of TiO2 in the design of biosensor membranes with improved long-term in vivo transport properties. Micropatterned Ti films were sputtered onto quartz surfaces in a series of hexagonally distributed dots with identical coverage area of 23% and dot size ranging from 5 to 100 microm. The antioxidant effect of the surfaces was investigated using a cell-free peroxynitrite donor assay and assays of superoxide released from stimulated surface-adhering neutrophils and macrophages. In all three assays, the amount of ROS was monitored using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Patterned surfaces in all experimental models significantly decreased ROS compared to the etched surfaces. In the cell-free experiment, the ROS reduction was only dependent on fractional surface coverage. In the cell experiments, however, a dot-size-dependent ROS reduction was seen, with the largest reduction at the smallest dot-size surfaces. These results indicate that micropatterned surfaces with small dots covering only 23% of the surface area exhibit similar antioxidative effect as fully covered surfaces. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
micropatterning, titanium oxide, neutrophils, macrophages, free radicals
in
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A
volume
77A
issue
1
pages
43 - 49
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:16345099
  • scopus:33645896414
ISSN
1552-4965
DOI
10.1002/jbm.a.30642
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2e57dab7-5ce1-4815-8cef-87b85ad2b94c (old id 1135215)
date added to LUP
2008-06-13 12:55:19
date last changed
2019-11-13 02:11:49
@article{2e57dab7-5ce1-4815-8cef-87b85ad2b94c,
  abstract     = {Prolonged inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated around an implanted biosensor are the primary causes of the foreign body response, including encapsulation of biosensor membranes. We have previously demonstrated that TiO2 surfaces reduce ROS. Here we investigated the potential of using the anti-inflammatory properties of TiO2 in the design of biosensor membranes with improved long-term in vivo transport properties. Micropatterned Ti films were sputtered onto quartz surfaces in a series of hexagonally distributed dots with identical coverage area of 23% and dot size ranging from 5 to 100 microm. The antioxidant effect of the surfaces was investigated using a cell-free peroxynitrite donor assay and assays of superoxide released from stimulated surface-adhering neutrophils and macrophages. In all three assays, the amount of ROS was monitored using luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Patterned surfaces in all experimental models significantly decreased ROS compared to the etched surfaces. In the cell-free experiment, the ROS reduction was only dependent on fractional surface coverage. In the cell experiments, however, a dot-size-dependent ROS reduction was seen, with the largest reduction at the smallest dot-size surfaces. These results indicate that micropatterned surfaces with small dots covering only 23% of the surface area exhibit similar antioxidative effect as fully covered surfaces.},
  author       = {Sahlin, Herman and Contreras, Ramiro and Gaskill, Daniel F and Bjursten, Lars Magnus and Frangos, John A},
  issn         = {1552-4965},
  keyword      = {micropatterning,titanium oxide,neutrophils,macrophages,free radicals},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--49},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A},
  title        = {Anti-inflammatory properties of micropatterned titanium coatings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.30642},
  volume       = {77A},
  year         = {2006},
}