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Does aspirin protect against Alzheimer's dementia? A study in a Swedish population-based sample aged >= 80 years

Nilsson, SE; Johansson, B; Takkinen, S; Berg, S; Zarit, S; McClearn, G and Melander, Arne LU (2003) In European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 59(4). p.313-319
Abstract
Objective. It has been reported that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may protect against dementia of Alzheimer's type and/or vascular dementia. However, co-morbidity and the dose of aspirin may be critical. A major indication for low-dose aspirin is prophylaxis after stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, conditions that may obscure an anti-dementia effect by the drug. Alternatively, low-dose aspirin may be insufficient if the protective effect is due to an anti-inflammatory mechanism. The aim of this study was to assess whether high-dose or low-dose aspirin may protect against Alzheimer's dementia in subjects aged greater than or equal to80 years. For comparison, effects of (other) NSAID, paracetamol and... (More)
Objective. It has been reported that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may protect against dementia of Alzheimer's type and/or vascular dementia. However, co-morbidity and the dose of aspirin may be critical. A major indication for low-dose aspirin is prophylaxis after stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, conditions that may obscure an anti-dementia effect by the drug. Alternatively, low-dose aspirin may be insufficient if the protective effect is due to an anti-inflammatory mechanism. The aim of this study was to assess whether high-dose or low-dose aspirin may protect against Alzheimer's dementia in subjects aged greater than or equal to80 years. For comparison, effects of (other) NSAID, paracetamol and D-propoxyphene were studied. Methods. Global, cross-sectional, and longitudinal (1991-2000) epidemiological analyses of clinical, cognitive and drug treatment data on 702 individuals 80 years old or more (351 twin pairs of same sex), all alive at inclusion: mean age 83.9 years (80-99 years). Calculations were made with logistic regression of associations between use of various analgesics and cognitive function, after adjustment for age, gender, and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Results. Users of high-dose aspirin had significantly lower prevalence of Alzheimer's dementia and better-maintained cognitive function than non-users. There were numerically similar but not significant associations with use of low-dose aspirin and other NSAID. There were no such associations with use of either paracetamol or D-propoxyphene. Conclusion. Aspirin might protect against Alzheimer's disease, but controlled trials are warranted. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alzheimer, aspirin, NSAID
in
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
volume
59
issue
4
pages
313 - 319
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000184777200008
  • pmid:12827329
  • scopus:0042913340
ISSN
1432-1041
DOI
10.1007/s00228-003-0618-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7dfa3d7d-db3c-4ce0-86c0-6bfa58356bc8 (old id 303958)
date added to LUP
2007-09-19 12:24:38
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:20:12
@article{7dfa3d7d-db3c-4ce0-86c0-6bfa58356bc8,
  abstract     = {Objective. It has been reported that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may protect against dementia of Alzheimer's type and/or vascular dementia. However, co-morbidity and the dose of aspirin may be critical. A major indication for low-dose aspirin is prophylaxis after stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, conditions that may obscure an anti-dementia effect by the drug. Alternatively, low-dose aspirin may be insufficient if the protective effect is due to an anti-inflammatory mechanism. The aim of this study was to assess whether high-dose or low-dose aspirin may protect against Alzheimer's dementia in subjects aged greater than or equal to80 years. For comparison, effects of (other) NSAID, paracetamol and D-propoxyphene were studied. Methods. Global, cross-sectional, and longitudinal (1991-2000) epidemiological analyses of clinical, cognitive and drug treatment data on 702 individuals 80 years old or more (351 twin pairs of same sex), all alive at inclusion: mean age 83.9 years (80-99 years). Calculations were made with logistic regression of associations between use of various analgesics and cognitive function, after adjustment for age, gender, and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Results. Users of high-dose aspirin had significantly lower prevalence of Alzheimer's dementia and better-maintained cognitive function than non-users. There were numerically similar but not significant associations with use of low-dose aspirin and other NSAID. There were no such associations with use of either paracetamol or D-propoxyphene. Conclusion. Aspirin might protect against Alzheimer's disease, but controlled trials are warranted.},
  author       = {Nilsson, SE and Johansson, B and Takkinen, S and Berg, S and Zarit, S and McClearn, G and Melander, Arne},
  issn         = {1432-1041},
  keyword      = {Alzheimer,aspirin,NSAID},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {313--319},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  title        = {Does aspirin protect against Alzheimer's dementia? A study in a Swedish population-based sample aged >= 80 years},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00228-003-0618-y},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2003},
}