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On the tip of the tongue: Learning typing and pointing with an intra-oral interface

Caltenco, Héctor LU ; Breidegard, Björn LU and Andreasen Struijk, Lotte N.S. (2014) In Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology 9(4). p.307-317
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate typing and pointing performance and improvement over time of four able-bodied participants using an intra-oral tongue-computer interface for computer control. Background: A physically disabled individual may lack the ability to efficiently control standard computer input devices. There have been several efforts to produce and evaluate interfaces that provide individuals with physical disabilities the possibility to control personal computers. Method: Training with the intra-oral tongue-computer interface was performed by playing games over 18 sessions. Skill improvement was measured through typing and pointing exercises at the end of each training session. Results: Typing throughput improved from averages of 2.36 to... (More)
Purpose: To evaluate typing and pointing performance and improvement over time of four able-bodied participants using an intra-oral tongue-computer interface for computer control. Background: A physically disabled individual may lack the ability to efficiently control standard computer input devices. There have been several efforts to produce and evaluate interfaces that provide individuals with physical disabilities the possibility to control personal computers. Method: Training with the intra-oral tongue-computer interface was performed by playing games over 18 sessions. Skill improvement was measured through typing and pointing exercises at the end of each training session. Results: Typing throughput improved from averages of 2.36 to 5.43 correct words per minute. Pointing throughput improved from averages of 0.47 to 0.85 bits/s. Target tracking performance, measured as relative time on target, improved from averages of 36% to 47%. Path following throughput improved from averages of 0.31 to 0.83 bits/s and decreased to 0.53 bits/s with more difficult tasks. Conclusions: Learning curves support the notion that the tongue can rapidly learn novel motor tasks. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, which makes the tongue a feasible input organ for computer control. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
usability, throughput, performance, learning, computer interface, computer input, Assistive technology
in
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
volume
9
issue
4
pages
307 - 317
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84901926578
ISSN
1748-3115
DOI
10.3109/17483107.2013.785038
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ab06db4-2de1-4590-964f-64eac1c002e8 (old id 3045297)
date added to LUP
2015-10-01 15:11:23
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:00:47
@article{7ab06db4-2de1-4590-964f-64eac1c002e8,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To evaluate typing and pointing performance and improvement over time of four able-bodied participants using an intra-oral tongue-computer interface for computer control. Background: A physically disabled individual may lack the ability to efficiently control standard computer input devices. There have been several efforts to produce and evaluate interfaces that provide individuals with physical disabilities the possibility to control personal computers. Method: Training with the intra-oral tongue-computer interface was performed by playing games over 18 sessions. Skill improvement was measured through typing and pointing exercises at the end of each training session. Results: Typing throughput improved from averages of 2.36 to 5.43 correct words per minute. Pointing throughput improved from averages of 0.47 to 0.85 bits/s. Target tracking performance, measured as relative time on target, improved from averages of 36% to 47%. Path following throughput improved from averages of 0.31 to 0.83 bits/s and decreased to 0.53 bits/s with more difficult tasks. Conclusions: Learning curves support the notion that the tongue can rapidly learn novel motor tasks. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, which makes the tongue a feasible input organ for computer control.},
  author       = {Caltenco, Héctor and Breidegard, Björn and Andreasen Struijk, Lotte N.S.},
  issn         = {1748-3115},
  keyword      = {usability,throughput,performance,learning,computer interface,computer input,Assistive technology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {307--317},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology},
  title        = {On the tip of the tongue: Learning typing and pointing with an intra-oral interface},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17483107.2013.785038},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}