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Neonatal Complications After Maternal Concomitant Use of SSRI and Other Central Nervous System Active Drugs During the Second or Third Trimester of Pregnancy.

Källén, Bengt LU and Reis, Margareta LU (2012) In Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 32(5). p.608-614
Abstract
Drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS) and given to a pregnant woman during the latter part of pregnancy may affect neonatal morbidity of the infant. Little is known on the combined effects of different categories of such drugs. The redeeming of prescriptions for CNS-active drugs during the second or third trimester of pregnancy was studied by linkage between a register of prescribed drugs and the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the deliveries during 2006-2008 (n = 15,045 live-born infants). Neonatal morbidity was defined as the presence of neonatal diagnoses of respiratory problems, hypoglycemia, convulsions, or other CNS pathologic abnormalities including intraventricular hemorrhage, or low 5-minute Apgar score. The risk of... (More)
Drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS) and given to a pregnant woman during the latter part of pregnancy may affect neonatal morbidity of the infant. Little is known on the combined effects of different categories of such drugs. The redeeming of prescriptions for CNS-active drugs during the second or third trimester of pregnancy was studied by linkage between a register of prescribed drugs and the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the deliveries during 2006-2008 (n = 15,045 live-born infants). Neonatal morbidity was defined as the presence of neonatal diagnoses of respiratory problems, hypoglycemia, convulsions, or other CNS pathologic abnormalities including intraventricular hemorrhage, or low 5-minute Apgar score. The risk of such neonatal morbidity after maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with or without other CNS-active drugs were evaluated as odds ratios or risk ratios, comparing with unexposed infants or infants only exposed to SSRI drugs. An increased risk for neonatal morbidity was seen for most studied groups of CNS-active drugs when used alone. Benzodiazepines seemed to have a stronger effect than other sedatives/hypnotics. The combination of SSRIs with 1 or more other CNS-active drug groups increased the risk for neonatal morbidity. This was seen for all types of sedatives/hypnotics, which may suggest a confounding by indication. Polypharmacy with CNS-active drugs during the later part of the pregnancy seems to increase the occurrence of neonatal morbidity but difference in nature or strength of underlying psychiatric pathology may confound the findings. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
volume
32
issue
5
pages
608 - 614
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000308671800005
  • pmid:22926593
  • scopus:84865860691
ISSN
0271-0749
DOI
10.1097/JCP.0b013e3182668568
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a3ca5957-e4b7-4bbc-b582-ae2cf48cb46d (old id 3047102)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22926593?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 21:41:54
date last changed
2017-03-05 04:23:35
@article{a3ca5957-e4b7-4bbc-b582-ae2cf48cb46d,
  abstract     = {Drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS) and given to a pregnant woman during the latter part of pregnancy may affect neonatal morbidity of the infant. Little is known on the combined effects of different categories of such drugs. The redeeming of prescriptions for CNS-active drugs during the second or third trimester of pregnancy was studied by linkage between a register of prescribed drugs and the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the deliveries during 2006-2008 (n = 15,045 live-born infants). Neonatal morbidity was defined as the presence of neonatal diagnoses of respiratory problems, hypoglycemia, convulsions, or other CNS pathologic abnormalities including intraventricular hemorrhage, or low 5-minute Apgar score. The risk of such neonatal morbidity after maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with or without other CNS-active drugs were evaluated as odds ratios or risk ratios, comparing with unexposed infants or infants only exposed to SSRI drugs. An increased risk for neonatal morbidity was seen for most studied groups of CNS-active drugs when used alone. Benzodiazepines seemed to have a stronger effect than other sedatives/hypnotics. The combination of SSRIs with 1 or more other CNS-active drug groups increased the risk for neonatal morbidity. This was seen for all types of sedatives/hypnotics, which may suggest a confounding by indication. Polypharmacy with CNS-active drugs during the later part of the pregnancy seems to increase the occurrence of neonatal morbidity but difference in nature or strength of underlying psychiatric pathology may confound the findings.},
  author       = {Källén, Bengt and Reis, Margareta},
  issn         = {0271-0749},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {608--614},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology},
  title        = {Neonatal Complications After Maternal Concomitant Use of SSRI and Other Central Nervous System Active Drugs During the Second or Third Trimester of Pregnancy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0b013e3182668568},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2012},
}