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Marital status, social capital and health locus of control: A population-based study.

Lindström, Martin LU and Rosvall, Maria LU (2012) In Public Health 126(9). p.790-795
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association between marital status and lack of internal health locus of control (HLC), taking economic stress and trust into account.



STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.



METHODS:

The public health survey Skåne 2008 is a postal questionnaire study (55% participation rate). A random sample was invited to participate, and 28,198 individuals aged 18-80 years agreed. Logistic regression models were used to discern associations between marital status and lack of internal HLC. The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and 'horizontal' trust.



RESULTS:

In total, 33.7%... (More)
OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association between marital status and lack of internal health locus of control (HLC), taking economic stress and trust into account.



STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.



METHODS:

The public health survey Skåne 2008 is a postal questionnaire study (55% participation rate). A random sample was invited to participate, and 28,198 individuals aged 18-80 years agreed. Logistic regression models were used to discern associations between marital status and lack of internal HLC. The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and 'horizontal' trust.



RESULTS:

In total, 33.7% of the men and 31.8% of the women lacked internal HLC. After age-adjustments, the unmarried and divorced men and the widowed women displayed significantly higher odds ratios of lack of internal HLC. The significantly higher odds ratios only remained for unmarried men throughout the multiple analyses. In contrast, divorced women had significantly lower odds ratios of lack of internal HLC than married women after adjustments for economic stress.



CONCLUSIONS:

Health promotion regarding HLC and related behaviours should consider men and women who are not cohabiting. Health promotion should particularly consider unmarried men due to their higher propensity to lack internal HLC. The economic conditions and exposure to economic stress among widowed and divorced women should also be highlighted. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Public Health
volume
126
issue
9
pages
790 - 795
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000310116700012
  • pmid:22925881
  • scopus:84866052559
ISSN
1476-5616
DOI
10.1016/j.puhe.2012.06.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
af9f3e2a-651f-4398-a4e3-23dac29c4476 (old id 3047116)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22925881?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 21:30:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:51:37
@article{af9f3e2a-651f-4398-a4e3-23dac29c4476,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: <br/><br>
To investigate the association between marital status and lack of internal health locus of control (HLC), taking economic stress and trust into account. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
STUDY DESIGN: <br/><br>
Cross-sectional study. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: <br/><br>
The public health survey Skåne 2008 is a postal questionnaire study (55% participation rate). A random sample was invited to participate, and 28,198 individuals aged 18-80 years agreed. Logistic regression models were used to discern associations between marital status and lack of internal HLC. The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress and 'horizontal' trust. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
In total, 33.7% of the men and 31.8% of the women lacked internal HLC. After age-adjustments, the unmarried and divorced men and the widowed women displayed significantly higher odds ratios of lack of internal HLC. The significantly higher odds ratios only remained for unmarried men throughout the multiple analyses. In contrast, divorced women had significantly lower odds ratios of lack of internal HLC than married women after adjustments for economic stress. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
Health promotion regarding HLC and related behaviours should consider men and women who are not cohabiting. Health promotion should particularly consider unmarried men due to their higher propensity to lack internal HLC. The economic conditions and exposure to economic stress among widowed and divorced women should also be highlighted.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Rosvall, Maria},
  issn         = {1476-5616},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {790--795},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Public Health},
  title        = {Marital status, social capital and health locus of control: A population-based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2012.06.001},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2012},
}