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Physical activity reduces bone loss in the distal forearm in post-menopausal women - a 25-year prospective study.

Svejme, Ola LU ; Ahlborg, Henrik LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 24(1). p.159-165
Abstract
Intervention studies have shown that high-intensity training programs with duration of 1-3 years can influence bone mass in post-menopausal women. We wanted to investigate whether moderate physical activity could be associated with reduced post-menopausal bone loss also in the long-term perspective. We evaluated changes in bone mass and bone structure by repeated single-photon absorptiometry measurements of the distal forearm in 91 moderately physically active and 21 inactive women, categorized according to information from questionnaires, from menopause and on average 25 years onwards. Data were calculated with analysis of variance and analysis of covariance tests and presented as means with 95% confidence interval. There were no group... (More)
Intervention studies have shown that high-intensity training programs with duration of 1-3 years can influence bone mass in post-menopausal women. We wanted to investigate whether moderate physical activity could be associated with reduced post-menopausal bone loss also in the long-term perspective. We evaluated changes in bone mass and bone structure by repeated single-photon absorptiometry measurements of the distal forearm in 91 moderately physically active and 21 inactive women, categorized according to information from questionnaires, from menopause and on average 25 years onwards. Data were calculated with analysis of variance and analysis of covariance tests and presented as means with 95% confidence interval. There were no group differences in bone mass or bone structure at menopause. The mean annual loss in bone mineral content was 1.2% (1.1, 1.3) in the physically active and 1.6% (1.3, 1.8) in the inactive women (after adjustment for menopausal age P = 0.02) and the mean decline in a strength index based on bone mass and bone structure was 0.7% (0.6, 0.8) in the physically active and 1.2% (0.8, 1.5) in the inactive women (P = 0.004). There were no group differences in the changes in bone structure. Physical activity is also in a long-term perspective associated with reduced post-menopausal bone loss. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
volume
24
issue
1
pages
159 - 165
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000329915200027
  • pmid:22846059
  • scopus:84892896818
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01504.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d038c30d-3b82-4607-98ad-d489c0a23890 (old id 3047937)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22846059?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-03 21:34:44
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:18:13
@article{d038c30d-3b82-4607-98ad-d489c0a23890,
  abstract     = {Intervention studies have shown that high-intensity training programs with duration of 1-3 years can influence bone mass in post-menopausal women. We wanted to investigate whether moderate physical activity could be associated with reduced post-menopausal bone loss also in the long-term perspective. We evaluated changes in bone mass and bone structure by repeated single-photon absorptiometry measurements of the distal forearm in 91 moderately physically active and 21 inactive women, categorized according to information from questionnaires, from menopause and on average 25 years onwards. Data were calculated with analysis of variance and analysis of covariance tests and presented as means with 95% confidence interval. There were no group differences in bone mass or bone structure at menopause. The mean annual loss in bone mineral content was 1.2% (1.1, 1.3) in the physically active and 1.6% (1.3, 1.8) in the inactive women (after adjustment for menopausal age P = 0.02) and the mean decline in a strength index based on bone mass and bone structure was 0.7% (0.6, 0.8) in the physically active and 1.2% (0.8, 1.5) in the inactive women (P = 0.004). There were no group differences in the changes in bone structure. Physical activity is also in a long-term perspective associated with reduced post-menopausal bone loss.},
  author       = {Svejme, Ola and Ahlborg, Henrik and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {159--165},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Physical activity reduces bone loss in the distal forearm in post-menopausal women - a 25-year prospective study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01504.x},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2014},
}