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Exploration of the Domain of Application of the Renaissance 2.0 Approach

Nordin, Axel LU and Hopf, Andreas LU (2012)
Abstract
The current form-giving activity in industrial design is, by and large, characterised by explorations that depend on an individual’s capability to mentally manipulate a solution space from which to select and express the intended result. Designers often rely on artistic experimentation, aesthetic inspiration, or product specifications. Such approaches often lead to satisfactory results, but could profit from augmentation by methods of algorithmic form generation, optimisation, and use of natural-mathematical morphologies. By adopting this approach, designers would be able to efficiently use forms that have previously been too complex to handle and evaluate manually. If successful, such an approach would lead to the expansion of the... (More)
The current form-giving activity in industrial design is, by and large, characterised by explorations that depend on an individual’s capability to mentally manipulate a solution space from which to select and express the intended result. Designers often rely on artistic experimentation, aesthetic inspiration, or product specifications. Such approaches often lead to satisfactory results, but could profit from augmentation by methods of algorithmic form generation, optimisation, and use of natural-mathematical morphologies. By adopting this approach, designers would be able to efficiently use forms that have previously been too complex to handle and evaluate manually. If successful, such an approach would lead to the expansion of the morphological repertoire of the industrial designer, improve the integration of industrial design in the rest of the product development process, and, importantly, result in manifold opportunities for the customers to customise products.

The purpose of this report was to show that the domain of application of the approach is large and, therefore, worth pursuing and further developing in future research. To begin with, it was necessary to identify the key elements required for implementing the approach and then find members of each element category that, once combined, could facilitate the designing of very diverse products. These elements were: natural-mathematical morphologies, production technologies, materials and product typologies. Members of these element categories were then sought to ensure that a sufficiently large number of products could be designed through combinations of the element members. The conclusion is that such a feasible group of elements exists in the domain of 2.5D products based on 2D tessellations, sheet materials, and computer-controlled cutting and bending production technologies. Once combined, they enable creation and fabrication of very diverse products, even though only a small part of the domain has been surveyed. The conclusion is that the domain of application of the approach is vast. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
engineering design, industrial design, Computer aided design, morphological repertoire, production, generative design, Renaissance 2.0
pages
21 pages
publisher
Divisions of Machine Design and Industrial Design, Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c627a64c-441e-4fe7-8c89-a655bd8ed562 (old id 3052158)
date added to LUP
2012-09-27 15:16:18
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:19:39
@techreport{c627a64c-441e-4fe7-8c89-a655bd8ed562,
  abstract     = {The current form-giving activity in industrial design is, by and large, characterised by explorations that depend on an individual’s capability to mentally manipulate a solution space from which to select and express the intended result. Designers often rely on artistic experimentation, aesthetic inspiration, or product specifications. Such approaches often lead to satisfactory results, but could profit from augmentation by methods of algorithmic form generation, optimisation, and use of natural-mathematical morphologies. By adopting this approach, designers would be able to efficiently use forms that have previously been too complex to handle and evaluate manually. If successful, such an approach would lead to the expansion of the morphological repertoire of the industrial designer, improve the integration of industrial design in the rest of the product development process, and, importantly, result in manifold opportunities for the customers to customise products. <br/><br>
The purpose of this report was to show that the domain of application of the approach is large and, therefore, worth pursuing and further developing in future research. To begin with, it was necessary to identify the key elements required for implementing the approach and then find members of each element category that, once combined, could facilitate the designing of very diverse products. These elements were: natural-mathematical morphologies, production technologies, materials and product typologies. Members of these element categories were then sought to ensure that a sufficiently large number of products could be designed through combinations of the element members. The conclusion is that such a feasible group of elements exists in the domain of 2.5D products based on 2D tessellations, sheet materials, and computer-controlled cutting and bending production technologies. Once combined, they enable creation and fabrication of very diverse products, even though only a small part of the domain has been surveyed. The conclusion is that the domain of application of the approach is vast.},
  author       = {Nordin, Axel and Hopf, Andreas},
  institution  = {Divisions of Machine Design and Industrial Design, Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University},
  keyword      = {engineering design,industrial design,Computer aided design,morphological repertoire,production,generative design,Renaissance 2.0},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {21},
  title        = {Exploration of the Domain of Application of the Renaissance 2.0 Approach},
  year         = {2012},
}