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The epidemiology of cardiovascular defects, Part I: A study based on data from three large registries of congenital malformations

Pradat, P; Francannet, C; Harris, John LU and Robert, E (2003) In Pediatric Cardiology 24(3). p.195-221
Abstract
To analyze complex and noncomplex cardiac malformations regarding prevalence and in relation to demographic variables, we pooled data on infants (age I year or younger) with congenital cardiovascular defects from three large birth defect registries in California, Sweden, and France. Altogether. 12.932 infants had one or more congenital heart defects out of 4.4 million live births and stillbirths. The registries in Sweden and France obtained data through reporting from various sources; in California, medical records were reviewed. As expected, definitions and ascertained conditions differed among each of the registries. The total rates for severe defects were similar (1.43 per 1,000), but differed for specific defects. Clear differences in... (More)
To analyze complex and noncomplex cardiac malformations regarding prevalence and in relation to demographic variables, we pooled data on infants (age I year or younger) with congenital cardiovascular defects from three large birth defect registries in California, Sweden, and France. Altogether. 12.932 infants had one or more congenital heart defects out of 4.4 million live births and stillbirths. The registries in Sweden and France obtained data through reporting from various sources; in California, medical records were reviewed. As expected, definitions and ascertained conditions differed among each of the registries. The total rates for severe defects were similar (1.43 per 1,000), but differed for specific defects. Clear differences in epidemiological characteristics existed for specific defects; for example, severe cardiac defects sex ratios were significantly high for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, d-transposition of great vessels, double outlet right ventricle, total anoralous pulmonary venous return, tetralogy of Fallot, and significantly low for pulmonary atresia without ventricular septal defect and endocardial cushion defect. Few defects were similar for several epidemiological characteristics, but, for example, the combination of ventricular and atrial septal defects appeared equivalent with endocardial cushion defect under some circumstances, yet behaved differently with regard to associated noncardiovascular defects. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, congenital malformations, birth defects, cardiovascular defects
in
Pediatric Cardiology
volume
24
issue
3
pages
195 - 221
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000183286400002
  • scopus:0038213891
ISSN
0172-0643
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0ba7a1a7-ab5e-4a18-ace9-6b5bbafc4655 (old id 309526)
date added to LUP
2007-09-20 11:53:24
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:38:36
@article{0ba7a1a7-ab5e-4a18-ace9-6b5bbafc4655,
  abstract     = {To analyze complex and noncomplex cardiac malformations regarding prevalence and in relation to demographic variables, we pooled data on infants (age I year or younger) with congenital cardiovascular defects from three large birth defect registries in California, Sweden, and France. Altogether. 12.932 infants had one or more congenital heart defects out of 4.4 million live births and stillbirths. The registries in Sweden and France obtained data through reporting from various sources; in California, medical records were reviewed. As expected, definitions and ascertained conditions differed among each of the registries. The total rates for severe defects were similar (1.43 per 1,000), but differed for specific defects. Clear differences in epidemiological characteristics existed for specific defects; for example, severe cardiac defects sex ratios were significantly high for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, d-transposition of great vessels, double outlet right ventricle, total anoralous pulmonary venous return, tetralogy of Fallot, and significantly low for pulmonary atresia without ventricular septal defect and endocardial cushion defect. Few defects were similar for several epidemiological characteristics, but, for example, the combination of ventricular and atrial septal defects appeared equivalent with endocardial cushion defect under some circumstances, yet behaved differently with regard to associated noncardiovascular defects.},
  author       = {Pradat, P and Francannet, C and Harris, John and Robert, E},
  issn         = {0172-0643},
  keyword      = {epidemiology,congenital malformations,birth defects,cardiovascular defects},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {195--221},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Pediatric Cardiology},
  title        = {The epidemiology of cardiovascular defects, Part I: A study based on data from three large registries of congenital malformations},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2003},
}