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Both Low and High Serum IGF-I Levels Associate with Cancer Mortality in Older Men.

Svensson, Johan; Carlzon, Daniel; Petzold, Max; Karlsson, Magnus LU ; Ljunggren, Osten; Tivesten, Asa; Mellström, Dan and Ohlsson, Claes (2012) In The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Abstract
Background:

Although recent population-based studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between serum IGF-I concentration and all-cause mortality, the distribution of death causes underlying this association remains unclear. We hypothesized that high IGF-I levels associate with increased cancer mortality, whereas low IGF-I levels associate with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.



Methods:

Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (mean age 75.4, range 69-81 yr) included in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (Sweden) study. Mortality data were obtained from central registers with no loss of follow-up. The statistical analyses included Cox... (More)
Background:

Although recent population-based studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between serum IGF-I concentration and all-cause mortality, the distribution of death causes underlying this association remains unclear. We hypothesized that high IGF-I levels associate with increased cancer mortality, whereas low IGF-I levels associate with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.



Methods:

Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (mean age 75.4, range 69-81 yr) included in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (Sweden) study. Mortality data were obtained from central registers with no loss of follow-up. The statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach.



Results:

During the follow-up (mean 6.0 yr), 586 of the participants died (cancer deaths, n = 211; CVD deaths, n = 214). As expected, our data revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-I levels and all-cause mortality. Low as well as high serum IGF-I (quintile 1 or 5 vs. quintiles 2-4) associated with increased cancer mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34-2.58; and HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.37-2.65, respectively]. Only low serum IGF-I associated with increased CVD mortality (quintile 1 vs. quintiles 2-4, HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08-2.04). These associations remained after adjustment for multiple covariates and exclusion of men who died during the first 2 yr of follow-up.Conclusions:Our findings demonstrate that both low and high serum IGF-I levels are risk markers for increased cancer mortality in older men. Moreover, low IGF-I levels associate with increased CVD mortality. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000312003900064
  • pmid:23015658
  • scopus:84870728818
ISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jc.2012-2329
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fbf8202b-ac72-49c5-87ef-8e1d0074d533 (old id 3123592)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23015658?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-10-03 21:10:45
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:33:24
@article{fbf8202b-ac72-49c5-87ef-8e1d0074d533,
  abstract     = {Background:<br/><br>
Although recent population-based studies suggest a U-shaped relationship between serum IGF-I concentration and all-cause mortality, the distribution of death causes underlying this association remains unclear. We hypothesized that high IGF-I levels associate with increased cancer mortality, whereas low IGF-I levels associate with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods:<br/><br>
Serum IGF-I levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (mean age 75.4, range 69-81 yr) included in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (Sweden) study. Mortality data were obtained from central registers with no loss of follow-up. The statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results:<br/><br>
During the follow-up (mean 6.0 yr), 586 of the participants died (cancer deaths, n = 211; CVD deaths, n = 214). As expected, our data revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-I levels and all-cause mortality. Low as well as high serum IGF-I (quintile 1 or 5 vs. quintiles 2-4) associated with increased cancer mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34-2.58; and HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.37-2.65, respectively]. Only low serum IGF-I associated with increased CVD mortality (quintile 1 vs. quintiles 2-4, HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08-2.04). These associations remained after adjustment for multiple covariates and exclusion of men who died during the first 2 yr of follow-up.Conclusions:Our findings demonstrate that both low and high serum IGF-I levels are risk markers for increased cancer mortality in older men. Moreover, low IGF-I levels associate with increased CVD mortality.},
  author       = {Svensson, Johan and Carlzon, Daniel and Petzold, Max and Karlsson, Magnus and Ljunggren, Osten and Tivesten, Asa and Mellström, Dan and Ohlsson, Claes},
  issn         = {1945-7197},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  publisher    = {The Endocrine Society},
  series       = {The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  title        = {Both Low and High Serum IGF-I Levels Associate with Cancer Mortality in Older Men.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2012-2329},
  year         = {2012},
}