Advanced

Involvement of glutamate neurotransmission in the development of excessive wheel running in Lewis rats

Schwendt, M; Duncko, R; Makatsori, A; Moncek, F; Johansson, Barbro LU and Jezova, D (2003) In Neurochemical Research 28(3-4). p.653-657
Abstract
Physical activities such as long-distance running can form a habit and might be related to drug-induced addictive behaviors. We investigated possible modulations of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits during voluntary wheel running in brain regions implicated in reward and addiction. It was observed that Lewis rats progressively increased their amount of daily running, reaching maximum levels of 4-6 km/day. After 3 weeks of running, mRNA levels coding for NR2A and NR2B subunits were increased in the ventral tegmental area, while only NR2A mRNA levels were found to be elevated in the frontal cortex. Long-term wheel running was also associated with increased binding of specific NMDA receptor antagonist [H-3]CGP39653 in the frontal... (More)
Physical activities such as long-distance running can form a habit and might be related to drug-induced addictive behaviors. We investigated possible modulations of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits during voluntary wheel running in brain regions implicated in reward and addiction. It was observed that Lewis rats progressively increased their amount of daily running, reaching maximum levels of 4-6 km/day. After 3 weeks of running, mRNA levels coding for NR2A and NR2B subunits were increased in the ventral tegmental area, while only NR2A mRNA levels were found to be elevated in the frontal cortex. Long-term wheel running was also associated with increased binding of specific NMDA receptor antagonist [H-3]CGP39653 in the frontal cortex. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glutamate release by repeated administration of phenytoin (20 mg/kg IP for 21 days) significantly suppressed daily running. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission might be related to neurobiological mechanisms underlying the compulsive character of voluntary wheel running. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
phenytoin, binding, mRNA, wheel running, NMDA receptor, addictive behavior
in
Neurochemical Research
volume
28
issue
3-4
pages
653 - 657
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:12675157
  • wos:000181555000037
  • scopus:0037375884
ISSN
1573-6903
DOI
10.1023/A:1022854213991
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c37c8d99-6013-44f9-a874-00f9eb8fe661 (old id 315692)
date added to LUP
2007-09-21 12:09:05
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:50:22
@article{c37c8d99-6013-44f9-a874-00f9eb8fe661,
  abstract     = {Physical activities such as long-distance running can form a habit and might be related to drug-induced addictive behaviors. We investigated possible modulations of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits during voluntary wheel running in brain regions implicated in reward and addiction. It was observed that Lewis rats progressively increased their amount of daily running, reaching maximum levels of 4-6 km/day. After 3 weeks of running, mRNA levels coding for NR2A and NR2B subunits were increased in the ventral tegmental area, while only NR2A mRNA levels were found to be elevated in the frontal cortex. Long-term wheel running was also associated with increased binding of specific NMDA receptor antagonist [H-3]CGP39653 in the frontal cortex. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glutamate release by repeated administration of phenytoin (20 mg/kg IP for 21 days) significantly suppressed daily running. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission might be related to neurobiological mechanisms underlying the compulsive character of voluntary wheel running.},
  author       = {Schwendt, M and Duncko, R and Makatsori, A and Moncek, F and Johansson, Barbro and Jezova, D},
  issn         = {1573-6903},
  keyword      = {phenytoin,binding,mRNA,wheel running,NMDA receptor,addictive behavior},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {653--657},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Neurochemical Research},
  title        = {Involvement of glutamate neurotransmission in the development of excessive wheel running in Lewis rats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022854213991},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2003},
}