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Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in food.

Tham, Johan LU ; Walder, Mats LU ; Melander, Eva LU and Odenholt, Inga LU (2012) In Infection and Drug Resistance 5. p.143-147
Abstract
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae with Cefotaximase-München (CTX-M) enzymes are rapidly increasing worldwide and pose a threat to health care. ESBLs with CTX-M enzymes have been isolated from animals and different food products, but it is unknown if food imported from the Mediterranean area may be a possible reservoir of these bacteria. During 2007-2008, swab samples from food across different retail outlets (mostly food from the Mediterranean countries and Swedish chicken) were collected. Escherichia coli strains from Swedish meat and E. coli isolates from unspecified food from a Swedish food testing laboratory were also examined. In 349 of the 419 swab samples, growth of Enterobacteriaceae was found. In... (More)
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae with Cefotaximase-München (CTX-M) enzymes are rapidly increasing worldwide and pose a threat to health care. ESBLs with CTX-M enzymes have been isolated from animals and different food products, but it is unknown if food imported from the Mediterranean area may be a possible reservoir of these bacteria. During 2007-2008, swab samples from food across different retail outlets (mostly food from the Mediterranean countries and Swedish chicken) were collected. Escherichia coli strains from Swedish meat and E. coli isolates from unspecified food from a Swedish food testing laboratory were also examined. In 349 of the 419 swab samples, growth of Enterobacteriaceae was found. In most of the samples, there was also growth of Gram-negative environmental bacteria. Air dry-cured products contained significantly less Enterobacteriaceae isolates compared to lettuces; however, none of the examined Enterobacteriaceae harbored ESBLs. This study did not support the theory that imported food from the Mediterranean area or Swedish domestic food might constitute an important vehicle for the dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae; however, a spread from food to humans may have occurred after 2008. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Infection and Drug Resistance
volume
5
pages
143 - 147
publisher
Dove Press
external identifiers
  • PMID:23093909
ISSN
1178-6973
DOI
10.2147/IDR.S34941
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a129f286-ef3d-45f8-b83b-1f6e6ffbe5a4 (old id 3160428)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23093909?dopt=Abstract
http://www.dovepress.com/prevalence-of-extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing-bacteria-in-f-peer-reviewed-article-IDR
date added to LUP
2012-11-01 12:06:45
date last changed
2016-09-20 03:34:45
@article{a129f286-ef3d-45f8-b83b-1f6e6ffbe5a4,
  abstract     = {Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae with Cefotaximase-München (CTX-M) enzymes are rapidly increasing worldwide and pose a threat to health care. ESBLs with CTX-M enzymes have been isolated from animals and different food products, but it is unknown if food imported from the Mediterranean area may be a possible reservoir of these bacteria. During 2007-2008, swab samples from food across different retail outlets (mostly food from the Mediterranean countries and Swedish chicken) were collected. Escherichia coli strains from Swedish meat and E. coli isolates from unspecified food from a Swedish food testing laboratory were also examined. In 349 of the 419 swab samples, growth of Enterobacteriaceae was found. In most of the samples, there was also growth of Gram-negative environmental bacteria. Air dry-cured products contained significantly less Enterobacteriaceae isolates compared to lettuces; however, none of the examined Enterobacteriaceae harbored ESBLs. This study did not support the theory that imported food from the Mediterranean area or Swedish domestic food might constitute an important vehicle for the dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae; however, a spread from food to humans may have occurred after 2008.},
  author       = {Tham, Johan and Walder, Mats and Melander, Eva and Odenholt, Inga},
  issn         = {1178-6973},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {143--147},
  publisher    = {Dove Press},
  series       = {Infection and Drug Resistance},
  title        = {Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in food.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S34941},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2012},
}