Advanced

Influence of cell shape and aggregate formation on the optical properties of flowing whole blood

Enejder, AMK; Swartling, Johannes LU ; Aruna, P and Andersson-Engels, Stefan LU (2003) In Applied Optics 42(7). p.1384-1394
Abstract
We studied the influence of shape and secondary, or intercellular, organization on the absorption and scattering properties of red blood cells to determine whether these properties are of any practical significance for optical evaluation of whole blood and its constituents. A series of measurements of transmittance and reflectance of light from bovine blood in a flow cuvette was conducted with a 650-900-nm integrating sphere at shear rates of 0-1600 s(-1), from which the influence of cell orientation, elongation, and aggregate formation on the absorption (mu(a)) and the reduced scattering coefficients could be quantified. Aggregation was accompanied by a decrease of 4% in mu(s)' compared with the value in randomly oriented single cells.... (More)
We studied the influence of shape and secondary, or intercellular, organization on the absorption and scattering properties of red blood cells to determine whether these properties are of any practical significance for optical evaluation of whole blood and its constituents. A series of measurements of transmittance and reflectance of light from bovine blood in a flow cuvette was conducted with a 650-900-nm integrating sphere at shear rates of 0-1600 s(-1), from which the influence of cell orientation, elongation, and aggregate formation on the absorption (mu(a)) and the reduced scattering coefficients could be quantified. Aggregation was accompanied by a decrease of 4% in mu(s)' compared with the value in randomly oriented single cells. Increasing the degree of cell alignment and elongation as a result of increasing shear rate reduced mu(s)' by 6% and mu(a) by 3%, evaluated at a shear rate of 1600 s(-1). Comparison with T-matrix computations for oblate- and prolate-shaped cells with corresponding elongation and orientation indicates that the optical properties of whole blood are determined by those of its individual cells, though influenced by a collective scattering factor that depends on the cell-to-cell organization. We demonstrate that cell morphological changes must be taken into consideration when one is conducting whole blood spectroscopy. (C) 2003 Optical Society of America. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Applied Optics
volume
42
issue
7
pages
1384 - 1394
publisher
OSA
external identifiers
  • wos:000181379400026
  • pmid:12638895
  • scopus:0037363747
ISSN
2155-3165
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
daed5ec8-34bb-4ca2-a827-9359b6e921c3 (old id 317090)
alternative location
http://ao.osa.org/abstract.cfm?id=71381
date added to LUP
2007-08-29 15:13:22
date last changed
2018-02-11 03:24:37
@article{daed5ec8-34bb-4ca2-a827-9359b6e921c3,
  abstract     = {We studied the influence of shape and secondary, or intercellular, organization on the absorption and scattering properties of red blood cells to determine whether these properties are of any practical significance for optical evaluation of whole blood and its constituents. A series of measurements of transmittance and reflectance of light from bovine blood in a flow cuvette was conducted with a 650-900-nm integrating sphere at shear rates of 0-1600 s(-1), from which the influence of cell orientation, elongation, and aggregate formation on the absorption (mu(a)) and the reduced scattering coefficients could be quantified. Aggregation was accompanied by a decrease of 4% in mu(s)' compared with the value in randomly oriented single cells. Increasing the degree of cell alignment and elongation as a result of increasing shear rate reduced mu(s)' by 6% and mu(a) by 3%, evaluated at a shear rate of 1600 s(-1). Comparison with T-matrix computations for oblate- and prolate-shaped cells with corresponding elongation and orientation indicates that the optical properties of whole blood are determined by those of its individual cells, though influenced by a collective scattering factor that depends on the cell-to-cell organization. We demonstrate that cell morphological changes must be taken into consideration when one is conducting whole blood spectroscopy. (C) 2003 Optical Society of America.},
  author       = {Enejder, AMK and Swartling, Johannes and Aruna, P and Andersson-Engels, Stefan},
  issn         = {2155-3165},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1384--1394},
  publisher    = {OSA},
  series       = {Applied Optics},
  title        = {Influence of cell shape and aggregate formation on the optical properties of flowing whole blood},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2003},
}