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The strength of species interactions modifies population responses to environrnental variation in competitive communities

Ruokolainen, Lasse and Ripa, Jörgen LU (2012) In Journal of Theoretical Biology 310. p.199-205
Abstract
The life-history parameters of most living organisms are modified by fluctuations in environmental conditions. The impact of environmental autocorrelation on population persistence is well understood in single species systems. However, in multi-species communities the impact of stochasticity is complicated by the possibility of different species having differing intrinsic responses to the environment (environmental correlation). Previous work has shown that whether increasing between-species environmental correlation stabilises population fluctuations or not, depends on an interaction between density-dependence and environmental autocorrelation. Here we derive analytical conditions for how this interaction in turn depends on the strength... (More)
The life-history parameters of most living organisms are modified by fluctuations in environmental conditions. The impact of environmental autocorrelation on population persistence is well understood in single species systems. However, in multi-species communities the impact of stochasticity is complicated by the possibility of different species having differing intrinsic responses to the environment (environmental correlation). Previous work has shown that whether increasing between-species environmental correlation stabilises population fluctuations or not, depends on an interaction between density-dependence and environmental autocorrelation. Here we derive analytical conditions for how this interaction in turn depends on the strength of interspecific competition. Under relatively weak between-species interactions, increasing environmental autocorrelation always dampens population fluctuations, while increasing autocorrelation destabilises strongly interacting populations. In contrast, under intermediate interaction strengths, increasing autocorrelation destabilises (stabilises) population dynamics when populations respond independently (similarly) to environmental fluctuations. These results apply to a wide range of competitive communities and also have some relevance to consumer-resource systems. The results presented here help us better understand population responses to environmental fluctuations under different conditions. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Autocorrelation, Competition, Density dependence, Environmental, correlation, Stability
in
Journal of Theoretical Biology
volume
310
pages
199 - 205
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000308447900021
  • scopus:84864062863
ISSN
1095-8541
DOI
10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.06.035
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e63944a4-a992-4f33-923a-0ea6dd8eb8a2 (old id 3189675)
date added to LUP
2012-12-04 14:50:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:21:39
@article{e63944a4-a992-4f33-923a-0ea6dd8eb8a2,
  abstract     = {The life-history parameters of most living organisms are modified by fluctuations in environmental conditions. The impact of environmental autocorrelation on population persistence is well understood in single species systems. However, in multi-species communities the impact of stochasticity is complicated by the possibility of different species having differing intrinsic responses to the environment (environmental correlation). Previous work has shown that whether increasing between-species environmental correlation stabilises population fluctuations or not, depends on an interaction between density-dependence and environmental autocorrelation. Here we derive analytical conditions for how this interaction in turn depends on the strength of interspecific competition. Under relatively weak between-species interactions, increasing environmental autocorrelation always dampens population fluctuations, while increasing autocorrelation destabilises strongly interacting populations. In contrast, under intermediate interaction strengths, increasing autocorrelation destabilises (stabilises) population dynamics when populations respond independently (similarly) to environmental fluctuations. These results apply to a wide range of competitive communities and also have some relevance to consumer-resource systems. The results presented here help us better understand population responses to environmental fluctuations under different conditions. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ruokolainen, Lasse and Ripa, Jörgen},
  issn         = {1095-8541},
  keyword      = {Autocorrelation,Competition,Density dependence,Environmental,correlation,Stability},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {199--205},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Journal of Theoretical Biology},
  title        = {The strength of species interactions modifies population responses to environrnental variation in competitive communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.06.035},
  volume       = {310},
  year         = {2012},
}