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The influence of ageing and exercise on tendon growth and degeneration - hypotheses for the initiation and prevention of strain-induced tendinopathies

Smith, RKW ; Birch, HL ; Goodman, S ; Heinegård, Dick LU and Goodship, AE (2002) In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A 133(4). p.1039-1050
Abstract
Strain-induced tendinopathy is a common injury in both human and equine athletes, with increasing incidence associated with greater involvement in sport and an increasingly aged population. This paper reviews our studies on the abundant non-collagenous protein, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), in equine tendons. Its variation between tendon type and site, age and exercise has provided an insight into how age and exercise influence tendon growth and maturation. Tendons can be broadly divided into two types, reflecting their different matrix composition and function: the energy-storing tendons used for weight-bearing and locomotion, which suffer a high incidence of strain-induced tendinopathy, and positional tendons involved in... (More)
Strain-induced tendinopathy is a common injury in both human and equine athletes, with increasing incidence associated with greater involvement in sport and an increasingly aged population. This paper reviews our studies on the abundant non-collagenous protein, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), in equine tendons. Its variation between tendon type and site, age and exercise has provided an insight into how age and exercise influence tendon growth and maturation. Tendons can be broadly divided into two types, reflecting their different matrix composition and function: the energy-storing tendons used for weight-bearing and locomotion, which suffer a high incidence of strain-induced tendinopathy, and positional tendons involved in limb placement or manipulative skills. It would appear that while energy-storing tendon can respond to the mechanical forces applied to it during growth, there is no evidence that it can do so after skeletal maturity. Instead, cumulative fatigue damage causes degeneration at the molecular level, potentially weakening it and increasing the risk of clinical injury. Appropriate exercise regimes early in life may help to improve the quality of growing tendon, thereby reducing the incidence of injury during ageing or subsequent athletic career. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), tendinopathy, degeneration, physiology, exercise, tendon, ageing, matrix
in
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A
volume
133
issue
4
pages
1039 - 1050
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:12485691
  • wos:000179966900012
  • scopus:6444245091
ISSN
1531-4332
DOI
10.1016/S1095-6433(02)00148-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Connective Tissue Biology (013230151)
id
9fa65814-5147-4990-bbbc-15c592c27a05 (old id 321374)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:21:47
date last changed
2020-06-03 01:58:00
@article{9fa65814-5147-4990-bbbc-15c592c27a05,
  abstract     = {Strain-induced tendinopathy is a common injury in both human and equine athletes, with increasing incidence associated with greater involvement in sport and an increasingly aged population. This paper reviews our studies on the abundant non-collagenous protein, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), in equine tendons. Its variation between tendon type and site, age and exercise has provided an insight into how age and exercise influence tendon growth and maturation. Tendons can be broadly divided into two types, reflecting their different matrix composition and function: the energy-storing tendons used for weight-bearing and locomotion, which suffer a high incidence of strain-induced tendinopathy, and positional tendons involved in limb placement or manipulative skills. It would appear that while energy-storing tendon can respond to the mechanical forces applied to it during growth, there is no evidence that it can do so after skeletal maturity. Instead, cumulative fatigue damage causes degeneration at the molecular level, potentially weakening it and increasing the risk of clinical injury. Appropriate exercise regimes early in life may help to improve the quality of growing tendon, thereby reducing the incidence of injury during ageing or subsequent athletic career. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Smith, RKW and Birch, HL and Goodman, S and Heinegård, Dick and Goodship, AE},
  issn         = {1531-4332},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1039--1050},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A},
  title        = {The influence of ageing and exercise on tendon growth and degeneration - hypotheses for the initiation and prevention of strain-induced tendinopathies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1095-6433(02)00148-4},
  doi          = {10.1016/S1095-6433(02)00148-4},
  volume       = {133},
  year         = {2002},
}