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Working with Facebook in Public Libraries: A Backstage Glimpse into the Library 2.0 Rhetoric

Carlsson, Hanna LU (2012) In Libri 62(3). p.199-210
Abstract
Ideals and visions of a Library 2.0 have in recent years been widely discussed in public library research and practice. Influenced by the Web 2.0 discourse, the Library 2.0 rhetoric has to a large extent been coloured by utopian and revolutionary overtones, identifying

social media as key to transforming the public library institution. While previous research has primarily addressed this development conceptually, this paper explores how the visions of Library 2.0 are put to work in everyday practices. Drawing on ethnographic data, this paper critically examines the micro-level interplay between the social networking site Facebook and librarianship in the setting of a Swedish public library.

The study reveals that the... (More)
Ideals and visions of a Library 2.0 have in recent years been widely discussed in public library research and practice. Influenced by the Web 2.0 discourse, the Library 2.0 rhetoric has to a large extent been coloured by utopian and revolutionary overtones, identifying

social media as key to transforming the public library institution. While previous research has primarily addressed this development conceptually, this paper explores how the visions of Library 2.0 are put to work in everyday practices. Drawing on ethnographic data, this paper critically examines the micro-level interplay between the social networking site Facebook and librarianship in the setting of a Swedish public library.

The study reveals that the labour required to realize the visions of Library 2.0 is characterized by a constant flux between self-determination and precarity (i.e. existence without predictability or security). While the librarians participating in the study creatively construct new routines and strategies for doing work, they are always at the beck and call of Facebook and have only marginal opportunities of influencing the technology they use. Still, this everyday and situated use gives them a possibility of interpreting the purpose of Facebook differently. The paper suggests that by articulating such alternative understandings of technology

more clearly public libraries could reject a position of being merely victims of technological change and make a difference in ICT-development. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Facebook, public libraries, social media, Information studies, Biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap
in
Libri
volume
62
issue
3
pages
199 - 210
publisher
De Gruyter
external identifiers
  • wos:000312437300001
  • scopus:84870160504
ISSN
0024-2667
DOI
10.1515/libri-2012-0016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1df68d4e-10cc-4c9a-b1a6-f93faa21a494 (old id 3242405)
date added to LUP
2012-12-20 12:52:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:13:58
@article{1df68d4e-10cc-4c9a-b1a6-f93faa21a494,
  abstract     = {Ideals and visions of a Library 2.0 have in recent years been widely discussed in public library research and practice. Influenced by the Web 2.0 discourse, the Library 2.0 rhetoric has to a large extent been coloured by utopian and revolutionary overtones, identifying<br/><br>
social media as key to transforming the public library institution. While previous research has primarily addressed this development conceptually, this paper explores how the visions of Library 2.0 are put to work in everyday practices. Drawing on ethnographic data, this paper critically examines the micro-level interplay between the social networking site Facebook and librarianship in the setting of a Swedish public library.<br/><br>
The study reveals that the labour required to realize the visions of Library 2.0 is characterized by a constant flux between self-determination and precarity (i.e. existence without predictability or security). While the librarians participating in the study creatively construct new routines and strategies for doing work, they are always at the beck and call of Facebook and have only marginal opportunities of influencing the technology they use. Still, this everyday and situated use gives them a possibility of interpreting the purpose of Facebook differently. The paper suggests that by articulating such alternative understandings of technology<br/><br>
more clearly public libraries could reject a position of being merely victims of technological change and make a difference in ICT-development.},
  author       = {Carlsson, Hanna},
  issn         = {0024-2667},
  keyword      = {Facebook,public libraries,social media,Information studies,Biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {199--210},
  publisher    = {De Gruyter},
  series       = {Libri},
  title        = {Working with Facebook in Public Libraries: A Backstage Glimpse into the Library 2.0 Rhetoric},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/libri-2012-0016},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2012},
}