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Exploiting online in-situ ammonium, nitrate and phosphate sensors in full-scale wastewater plant operation

Ingildsen, P and Olsson, Gustaf LU (2002) In Water Science and Technology 46(4-5). p.139-147
Abstract
In-situ nutrient sensors are now a proven technology. Having ion membranes eliminates the need for ultrafiltration, and consequently the sensors can be located at suitable places in any of the reactors. This gives the potential for new control structures for the control of nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal. In the paper some examples of such controllers are demonstrated as used in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. A successful control implementation scheme at full-scale plants includes three steps: monitoring, experimenting and controlling. The benefit of implementing process control based on nutrient sensors is real: by implementing precipitation dosage control a savings of 41 % compared to flow proportional... (More)
In-situ nutrient sensors are now a proven technology. Having ion membranes eliminates the need for ultrafiltration, and consequently the sensors can be located at suitable places in any of the reactors. This gives the potential for new control structures for the control of nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal. In the paper some examples of such controllers are demonstrated as used in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. A successful control implementation scheme at full-scale plants includes three steps: monitoring, experimenting and controlling. The benefit of implementing process control based on nutrient sensors is real: by implementing precipitation dosage control a savings of 41 % compared to flow proportional dosage can be reached, while the savings compared to constant dosage is 73 %. An increase in nitrate recirculation shows significant improvement in the nitrogen removal ability at very low cost. Reliable nutrient sensors are not the only prerequisite for a successful control system. The design of actuators, such as drives, compressors and valves, is often overlooked. Furthermore, the lower level controllers have to work properly before the more advanced controllers can work adequately. A collection of practical experience regarding such issues is given in this paper. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
nutrient removal, nutrient sensors, in-situ, control and automation, full-scale control implementation
in
Water Science and Technology
volume
46
issue
4-5
pages
139 - 147
publisher
IWA Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000178434900019
  • pmid:12361002
  • scopus:0036378646
ISSN
0273-1223
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cdff5f6e-501a-45e2-bee4-4aa5ba209142 (old id 325829)
alternative location
http://www.iwaponline.com/wst/04604/0139/046040139.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-10-22 15:41:43
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:57:24
@article{cdff5f6e-501a-45e2-bee4-4aa5ba209142,
  abstract     = {In-situ nutrient sensors are now a proven technology. Having ion membranes eliminates the need for ultrafiltration, and consequently the sensors can be located at suitable places in any of the reactors. This gives the potential for new control structures for the control of nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal. In the paper some examples of such controllers are demonstrated as used in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. A successful control implementation scheme at full-scale plants includes three steps: monitoring, experimenting and controlling. The benefit of implementing process control based on nutrient sensors is real: by implementing precipitation dosage control a savings of 41 % compared to flow proportional dosage can be reached, while the savings compared to constant dosage is 73 %. An increase in nitrate recirculation shows significant improvement in the nitrogen removal ability at very low cost. Reliable nutrient sensors are not the only prerequisite for a successful control system. The design of actuators, such as drives, compressors and valves, is often overlooked. Furthermore, the lower level controllers have to work properly before the more advanced controllers can work adequately. A collection of practical experience regarding such issues is given in this paper.},
  author       = {Ingildsen, P and Olsson, Gustaf},
  issn         = {0273-1223},
  keyword      = {nutrient removal,nutrient sensors,in-situ,control and automation,full-scale control implementation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4-5},
  pages        = {139--147},
  publisher    = {IWA Publishing},
  series       = {Water Science and Technology},
  title        = {Exploiting online in-situ ammonium, nitrate and phosphate sensors in full-scale wastewater plant operation},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2002},
}