Advanced

Plastoquinone redox control of chloroplast thylakoid protein phosphorylation and distribution of excitation energy between photosystems: discovery, background, implications

Allen, John LU (2002) In Photosynthesis Research 73(1-3). p.139-148
Abstract
Chloroplast thylakoid protein phosphorylation was discovered, and the most conspicuous phosphoproteins identified, by John Bennett at Warwick University. His initial findings were published in 1977. The phosphoproteins included apoproteins of chloroplast light harvesting complex II. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation was shown to influence distribution of excitation energy between Photosystems I and II in 1979, during a visit by Bennett to the laboratory of Charles J. Arntzen at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. That work was published by Bennett, Katherine E. Steinback and Arntzen in 1980. Control of both protein phosphorylation and excitation energy distribution by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool was first... (More)
Chloroplast thylakoid protein phosphorylation was discovered, and the most conspicuous phosphoproteins identified, by John Bennett at Warwick University. His initial findings were published in 1977. The phosphoproteins included apoproteins of chloroplast light harvesting complex II. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation was shown to influence distribution of excitation energy between Photosystems I and II in 1979, during a visit by Bennett to the laboratory of Charles J. Arntzen at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. That work was published by Bennett, Katherine E. Steinback and Arntzen in 1980. Control of both protein phosphorylation and excitation energy distribution by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool was first established in 1980 during the author's visit to Arntzen's laboratory. The experiments were prompted by the realization that coupling between redox state of an inter-photosystem electron carrier and excitation energy distribution provides a concrete mechanism for adaptations known as state transitions. This work was published by Allen, Bennett, Steinback, and Arntzen in 1981. This discovery and its background are discussed, together with some implications for photosynthesis and for research generally. This minireview is a personal account of the Urbana-Warwick and related collaborations in 1979-83: it includes impressions, conjectures, and acknowledgements for which the author is solely responsible. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Katherine E. Steinback, Alison Telfer, W. Patrick Williams, transitions, state, redox control, protein phosphorylation, plastoquinone, photosystem, light harvesting complex II, Peter Horton, enhancement, Robert Emerson, John Bennett, John F. Allen, Charles J. Arntzen
in
Photosynthesis Research
volume
73
issue
1-3
pages
139 - 148
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000178321400019
  • scopus:0036410160
ISSN
0166-8595
DOI
10.1023/A:1020414106993
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fc889f5e-f7ce-4970-8468-17658aa494cf (old id 326347)
date added to LUP
2007-08-06 14:55:18
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:33:27
@article{fc889f5e-f7ce-4970-8468-17658aa494cf,
  abstract     = {Chloroplast thylakoid protein phosphorylation was discovered, and the most conspicuous phosphoproteins identified, by John Bennett at Warwick University. His initial findings were published in 1977. The phosphoproteins included apoproteins of chloroplast light harvesting complex II. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation was shown to influence distribution of excitation energy between Photosystems I and II in 1979, during a visit by Bennett to the laboratory of Charles J. Arntzen at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. That work was published by Bennett, Katherine E. Steinback and Arntzen in 1980. Control of both protein phosphorylation and excitation energy distribution by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool was first established in 1980 during the author's visit to Arntzen's laboratory. The experiments were prompted by the realization that coupling between redox state of an inter-photosystem electron carrier and excitation energy distribution provides a concrete mechanism for adaptations known as state transitions. This work was published by Allen, Bennett, Steinback, and Arntzen in 1981. This discovery and its background are discussed, together with some implications for photosynthesis and for research generally. This minireview is a personal account of the Urbana-Warwick and related collaborations in 1979-83: it includes impressions, conjectures, and acknowledgements for which the author is solely responsible.},
  author       = {Allen, John},
  issn         = {0166-8595},
  keyword      = {Katherine E. Steinback,Alison Telfer,W. Patrick Williams,transitions,state,redox control,protein phosphorylation,plastoquinone,photosystem,light harvesting complex II,Peter Horton,enhancement,Robert Emerson,John Bennett,John F. Allen,Charles J. Arntzen},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {139--148},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Photosynthesis Research},
  title        = {Plastoquinone redox control of chloroplast thylakoid protein phosphorylation and distribution of excitation energy between photosystems: discovery, background, implications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1020414106993},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2002},
}