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The impact of ADHD and autism spectrum disorders on temperament, character, and personality development.

Anckarsäter, Henrik LU ; Stahlberg, Ola; Larson, Tomas; Hakansson, Catrin; Jutblad, Sig-Britt; Niklasson, Lena; Nydén, Agneta; Wentz, Elisabet; Westergren, Stefan and Cloninger, C Robert, et al. (2006) In American Journal of Psychiatry 163(7). p.1239-1244
Abstract
Objective: The authors describe personality development and disorders in relation to symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders. Method: Consecutive adults referred for neuropsychiatric investigation (N=240) were assessed for current and lifetime ADHD and autism spectrum disorders and completed the Temperament and Character Inventory. In a subgroup of subjects (N=174), presence of axis II personality disorders was also assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II). Results: Patients with ADHD reported high novelty seeking and high harm avoidance. Patients with autism spectrum disorders reported low novelty seeking, low reward dependence, and high... (More)
Objective: The authors describe personality development and disorders in relation to symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders. Method: Consecutive adults referred for neuropsychiatric investigation (N=240) were assessed for current and lifetime ADHD and autism spectrum disorders and completed the Temperament and Character Inventory. In a subgroup of subjects (N=174), presence of axis II personality disorders was also assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II). Results: Patients with ADHD reported high novelty seeking and high harm avoidance. Patients with autism spectrum disorders reported low novelty seeking, low reward dependence, and high harm avoidance. Character scores (self-directedness and cooperativeness) were extremely low among subjects with neuropsychiatric disorders, indicating a high overall prevalence of personality disorders, which was confirmed with the SCIDII. Cluster B personality disorders were more common in subjects with ADHD, while cluster A and C disorders were more common in those with autism spectrum disorders. The overlap between DSM-IV personality disorder categories was high, and they seem less clinically useful in this context. Conclusions: ADHD and autism spectrum disorders are associated with specific temperament configurations and an increased risk of personality disorders and deficits in character maturation. (Less)
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published
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in
American Journal of Psychiatry
volume
163
issue
7
pages
1239 - 1244
publisher
American Psychiatric Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:16816230
  • wos:000238712000022
ISSN
1535-7228
DOI
10.1176/appi.ajp.163.7.1239
language
English
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yes
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33195ca4-dedb-4a39-bce0-db11dc4cd9f2 (old id 159257)
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16816230&dopt=Abstract
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2007-07-11 09:29:18
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2019-08-18 04:00:02
@article{33195ca4-dedb-4a39-bce0-db11dc4cd9f2,
  abstract     = {Objective: The authors describe personality development and disorders in relation to symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders. Method: Consecutive adults referred for neuropsychiatric investigation (N=240) were assessed for current and lifetime ADHD and autism spectrum disorders and completed the Temperament and Character Inventory. In a subgroup of subjects (N=174), presence of axis II personality disorders was also assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II). Results: Patients with ADHD reported high novelty seeking and high harm avoidance. Patients with autism spectrum disorders reported low novelty seeking, low reward dependence, and high harm avoidance. Character scores (self-directedness and cooperativeness) were extremely low among subjects with neuropsychiatric disorders, indicating a high overall prevalence of personality disorders, which was confirmed with the SCIDII. Cluster B personality disorders were more common in subjects with ADHD, while cluster A and C disorders were more common in those with autism spectrum disorders. The overlap between DSM-IV personality disorder categories was high, and they seem less clinically useful in this context. Conclusions: ADHD and autism spectrum disorders are associated with specific temperament configurations and an increased risk of personality disorders and deficits in character maturation.},
  author       = {Anckarsäter, Henrik and Stahlberg, Ola and Larson, Tomas and Hakansson, Catrin and Jutblad, Sig-Britt and Niklasson, Lena and Nydén, Agneta and Wentz, Elisabet and Westergren, Stefan and Cloninger, C Robert and Gillberg, Christopher and Råstam, Maria},
  issn         = {1535-7228},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1239--1244},
  publisher    = {American Psychiatric Association},
  series       = {American Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {The impact of ADHD and autism spectrum disorders on temperament, character, and personality development.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.163.7.1239},
  volume       = {163},
  year         = {2006},
}