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Characterization of Hox genes in the bichir, Polypterus palmas

Ledje, Christina LU ; Kim, Chang-aeB and Ruddle, Francis H (2002) In Journal of Experimental Zoology 294(2). p.107-111
Abstract
It has been suggested that the increase in the number of Hox genes may have been one of the key events in vertebrate evolution. Invertebrates have one Hox cluster, while mammals have four. Interestingly, the number of Hox gene clusters is greater in the teleost fishes, zebrafish and medaka, than in mouse and human. The greater number of Hox clusters in the teleosts suggests that Hox gene duplication events have occurred during the radiation of ray-finned fishes. The question is when the Hox gene duplication event(s) that lead to seven Hox clusters in the teleosts actually occurred. We have addressed this question by studying the Hox genes in the bichir, Polypterus palmas. A preliminary PCR-estimation of the number of Hox genes suggests... (More)
It has been suggested that the increase in the number of Hox genes may have been one of the key events in vertebrate evolution. Invertebrates have one Hox cluster, while mammals have four. Interestingly, the number of Hox gene clusters is greater in the teleost fishes, zebrafish and medaka, than in mouse and human. The greater number of Hox clusters in the teleosts suggests that Hox gene duplication events have occurred during the radiation of ray-finned fishes. The question is when the Hox gene duplication event(s) that lead to seven Hox clusters in the teleosts actually occurred. We have addressed this question by studying the Hox genes in the bichir, Polypterus palmas. A preliminary PCR-estimation of the number of Hox genes suggests that Polypterus has five different Hox9 cognate group genes, which may be an indication of more than four Hox clusters in the bichir. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Experimental Zoology
volume
294
issue
2
pages
107 - 111
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000177187600003
  • pmid:12210111
  • scopus:0037103614
ISSN
0022-104X
DOI
10.1002/jez.10152
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
247a416a-6792-42ad-8f8d-57c4c47f4086 (old id 332290)
date added to LUP
2007-11-14 12:52:44
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:37:52
@article{247a416a-6792-42ad-8f8d-57c4c47f4086,
  abstract     = {It has been suggested that the increase in the number of Hox genes may have been one of the key events in vertebrate evolution. Invertebrates have one Hox cluster, while mammals have four. Interestingly, the number of Hox gene clusters is greater in the teleost fishes, zebrafish and medaka, than in mouse and human. The greater number of Hox clusters in the teleosts suggests that Hox gene duplication events have occurred during the radiation of ray-finned fishes. The question is when the Hox gene duplication event(s) that lead to seven Hox clusters in the teleosts actually occurred. We have addressed this question by studying the Hox genes in the bichir, Polypterus palmas. A preliminary PCR-estimation of the number of Hox genes suggests that Polypterus has five different Hox9 cognate group genes, which may be an indication of more than four Hox clusters in the bichir.},
  author       = {Ledje, Christina and Kim, Chang-aeB and Ruddle, Francis H},
  issn         = {0022-104X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {107--111},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Zoology},
  title        = {Characterization of Hox genes in the bichir, Polypterus palmas},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jez.10152},
  volume       = {294},
  year         = {2002},
}