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Chlorination byproducts and nitrate in drinking water and risk for congenital cardiac defects

Cedergren, MI; Selbing, AJ; Lofman, O and Källén, Bengt LU (2002) In Environmental Research 89(2). p.124-130
Abstract
Drinking water disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk for congenital defects including cardiac defects. Using Swedish health registers linked to information on municipal drinking water composition, individual data on drinking water characteristics were obtained for 58,669 women. Among the infants born, 753 had a cardiac defect. The risk for a cardiac defect was determined for ground water versus surface water, for different chlorination procedures, and for trihalomethane and nitrate concentrations. Ground water was associated with an increased risk for cardiac defect when crude rates were analyzed but after suitable adjustments this excess rate was found to be determined by chlorination procedures including... (More)
Drinking water disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk for congenital defects including cardiac defects. Using Swedish health registers linked to information on municipal drinking water composition, individual data on drinking water characteristics were obtained for 58,669 women. Among the infants born, 753 had a cardiac defect. The risk for a cardiac defect was determined for ground water versus surface water, for different chlorination procedures, and for trihalomethane and nitrate concentrations. Ground water was associated with an increased risk for cardiac defect when crude rates were analyzed but after suitable adjustments this excess rate was found to be determined by chlorination procedures including chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide appears itself as an independent risk factor for cardiac defects (adjusted odds ratio 1.61 (95% CI 1.00-2.59)). The risk for cardiac defects increased with increasing trihalomethane concentrations (P = 0.0005). There was an indicated but statistically nonsignificant excess risk associated with nitrate concentration. The individual risk for congenital cardiac defect caused by chlorine dioxide and trihalomethanes is small but as a large population is exposed to public drinking water, the attributable risk for cardiac defects may not be negligible. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
trihalomethane, nitrate, chlorination, cardiac defects, drinking water
in
Environmental Research
volume
89
issue
2
pages
124 - 130
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:12123645
  • wos:000176452500003
  • scopus:0036089861
ISSN
1096-0953
DOI
10.1006/enrs.2001.4362
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
633257b7-e092-4549-8a65-41469362d0d2 (old id 334556)
date added to LUP
2007-08-13 16:47:15
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:48:27
@article{633257b7-e092-4549-8a65-41469362d0d2,
  abstract     = {Drinking water disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk for congenital defects including cardiac defects. Using Swedish health registers linked to information on municipal drinking water composition, individual data on drinking water characteristics were obtained for 58,669 women. Among the infants born, 753 had a cardiac defect. The risk for a cardiac defect was determined for ground water versus surface water, for different chlorination procedures, and for trihalomethane and nitrate concentrations. Ground water was associated with an increased risk for cardiac defect when crude rates were analyzed but after suitable adjustments this excess rate was found to be determined by chlorination procedures including chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide appears itself as an independent risk factor for cardiac defects (adjusted odds ratio 1.61 (95% CI 1.00-2.59)). The risk for cardiac defects increased with increasing trihalomethane concentrations (P = 0.0005). There was an indicated but statistically nonsignificant excess risk associated with nitrate concentration. The individual risk for congenital cardiac defect caused by chlorine dioxide and trihalomethanes is small but as a large population is exposed to public drinking water, the attributable risk for cardiac defects may not be negligible. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).},
  author       = {Cedergren, MI and Selbing, AJ and Lofman, O and Källén, Bengt},
  issn         = {1096-0953},
  keyword      = {trihalomethane,nitrate,chlorination,cardiac defects,drinking water},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {124--130},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Environmental Research},
  title        = {Chlorination byproducts and nitrate in drinking water and risk for congenital cardiac defects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/enrs.2001.4362},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2002},
}