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Family history as a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for lone atrial fibrillation: a nationwide family study in Sweden.

Zöller, Bengt LU ; Ohlsson, Henrik LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 12(Dec.,10).
Abstract
ABSTRACT:



BACKGROUND:



Although the heritability of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been determined, the relevance of family history of AF for the likelihood of recurrent hospitalization for AF is unknown. The aim of this nationwide study was to determine whether family history of AF is a risk factor of recurrent hospitalization for lone AF (LAF), i.e., AF with unknown etiology. The familial risk for first time LAF hospitalization was also determined and compared to the risk of recurrent hospitalization for LAF.



METHODS:



We examined whether family history of AF is a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for LAF in the whole Swedish population. We linked... (More)
ABSTRACT:



BACKGROUND:



Although the heritability of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been determined, the relevance of family history of AF for the likelihood of recurrent hospitalization for AF is unknown. The aim of this nationwide study was to determine whether family history of AF is a risk factor of recurrent hospitalization for lone AF (LAF), i.e., AF with unknown etiology. The familial risk for first time LAF hospitalization was also determined and compared to the risk of recurrent hospitalization for LAF.



METHODS:



We examined whether family history of AF is a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for LAF in the whole Swedish population. We linked Multigeneration Register data on individuals aged 0-60 years to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1987-2009 to compare LAF recurrent hospitalization risk among individuals with and without parental or sibling history of AF. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) to determine the familial HR of recurrent hospitalization for LAF. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for familial risk of first time LAF hospitalization.



RESULTS:



The risk of recurrent LAF hospitalization was 1.23 (95% CI 1.17-1.30) for individuals with affected parents compared to 1.30 (95% CI 1.22-1.38) for those with affected siblings. After 10 years of follow up 50% of those without and 60% of those with family history had recurrent hospitalization for LAF. The risk of recurrent LAF hospitalization in individuals with two affected parents was 1.65 (95% CI 1.44-1.90). There was an interaction between age and family history, with family history having a weaker effect on LAF hospitalization risk in older age groups. The OR for first time LAF hospitalization was 2.08 (95% CI 2.02-2.15) for offspring with affected parents and 3.23 (95% CI 3.08-3.39) for individuals with affected siblings.



CONCLUSIONS:



Family history of AF is a novel risk factor for recurrent LAF hospitalization. The higher recurrence hospitalization risk in multiplex families and younger individuals suggests a genetic contribution. However, the familial risk for recurrent LAF hospitalization was much lower than the risk for first time LAF hospitalization, suggesting that familial and possibly genetic factors are more important for first time LAF hospitalization than recurrent LAF hospitalization. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
volume
12
issue
Dec.,10
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000312314000001
  • pmid:23227964
  • scopus:84871125527
ISSN
1471-2261
DOI
10.1186/1471-2261-12-121
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6d51742c-2606-4634-a44a-35d9a1808ae7 (old id 3347375)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23227964?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-01-02 15:45:40
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:50:11
@article{6d51742c-2606-4634-a44a-35d9a1808ae7,
  abstract     = {ABSTRACT:<br/><br>
<br/><br>
BACKGROUND: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Although the heritability of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been determined, the relevance of family history of AF for the likelihood of recurrent hospitalization for AF is unknown. The aim of this nationwide study was to determine whether family history of AF is a risk factor of recurrent hospitalization for lone AF (LAF), i.e., AF with unknown etiology. The familial risk for first time LAF hospitalization was also determined and compared to the risk of recurrent hospitalization for LAF.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
We examined whether family history of AF is a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for LAF in the whole Swedish population. We linked Multigeneration Register data on individuals aged 0-60 years to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1987-2009 to compare LAF recurrent hospitalization risk among individuals with and without parental or sibling history of AF. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) to determine the familial HR of recurrent hospitalization for LAF. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for familial risk of first time LAF hospitalization.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
The risk of recurrent LAF hospitalization was 1.23 (95% CI 1.17-1.30) for individuals with affected parents compared to 1.30 (95% CI 1.22-1.38) for those with affected siblings. After 10 years of follow up 50% of those without and 60% of those with family history had recurrent hospitalization for LAF. The risk of recurrent LAF hospitalization in individuals with two affected parents was 1.65 (95% CI 1.44-1.90). There was an interaction between age and family history, with family history having a weaker effect on LAF hospitalization risk in older age groups. The OR for first time LAF hospitalization was 2.08 (95% CI 2.02-2.15) for offspring with affected parents and 3.23 (95% CI 3.08-3.39) for individuals with affected siblings.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Family history of AF is a novel risk factor for recurrent LAF hospitalization. The higher recurrence hospitalization risk in multiplex families and younger individuals suggests a genetic contribution. However, the familial risk for recurrent LAF hospitalization was much lower than the risk for first time LAF hospitalization, suggesting that familial and possibly genetic factors are more important for first time LAF hospitalization than recurrent LAF hospitalization.},
  articleno    = {121},
  author       = {Zöller, Bengt and Ohlsson, Henrik and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1471-2261},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Dec.,10},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Cardiovascular Disorders},
  title        = {Family history as a risk factor for recurrent hospitalization for lone atrial fibrillation: a nationwide family study in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2261-12-121},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2012},
}