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Psychosocial work environment among Swedish audiologists.

Brännström, Jonas LU ; Båsjö, Sara; Larsson, Josefina; Lood, Sofie; Lundå, Stefan; Notsten, Margareta and Taheri, Satu Turunen (2012) In International Journal of Audiology
Abstract
Objective: The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded). Design: A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data. Study sample: Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists. Results: Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work... (More)
Objective: The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded). Design: A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data. Study sample: Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists. Results: Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work environment and is considered a reward in itself. Using the demand-control model, 29% of the audiologists reported working in a high-stress psychosocial work environment. Using the ERI-ratio to estimate the imbalance between effort and reward it was shown that that 86% of the participants experienced an unfavorable work situation where the rewards do not correspond to the efforts made. Conclusions: The organizational framework has minor effect on self-reported psychosocial work environment for Swedish licensed audiologists. The percentage of unfavorable ERI-ratios seen in Swedish audiologists seems conspicuously high compared to other working populations in general, but also compared to other health service workers. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
International Journal of Audiology
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000314697400003
  • pmid:23216266
  • scopus:84873928693
ISSN
1708-8186
DOI
10.3109/14992027.2012.743045
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f20009a6-ca3e-4699-8c1a-4429cf5c4152 (old id 3347555)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23216266?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-01-02 13:59:18
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:38:21
@article{f20009a6-ca3e-4699-8c1a-4429cf5c4152,
  abstract     = {Objective: The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded). Design: A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data. Study sample: Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists. Results: Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work environment and is considered a reward in itself. Using the demand-control model, 29% of the audiologists reported working in a high-stress psychosocial work environment. Using the ERI-ratio to estimate the imbalance between effort and reward it was shown that that 86% of the participants experienced an unfavorable work situation where the rewards do not correspond to the efforts made. Conclusions: The organizational framework has minor effect on self-reported psychosocial work environment for Swedish licensed audiologists. The percentage of unfavorable ERI-ratios seen in Swedish audiologists seems conspicuously high compared to other working populations in general, but also compared to other health service workers.},
  author       = {Brännström, Jonas and Båsjö, Sara and Larsson, Josefina and Lood, Sofie and Lundå, Stefan and Notsten, Margareta and Taheri, Satu Turunen},
  issn         = {1708-8186},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Audiology},
  title        = {Psychosocial work environment among Swedish audiologists.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2012.743045},
  year         = {2012},
}