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Control of oral closure in lingual stop consonant production

Löfqvist, Anders LU and Gracco, VL (2002) In Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 111(6). p.2811-2827
Abstract
Previous work has shown that the lips are moving at a high velocity when the oral closure occurs for bilabial stop consonants, resulting in tissue compression and mechanical interactions between the lips. The present experiment recorded tongue movements in four subjects during the production of velar and alveolar stop consonants to examine kinematic events before, during, and after the stop closure. The results show that, similar to the lips, the tongue is often moving at a high velocity at the onset of closure. The tongue movements were more complex, with both horizontal and vertical components. Movement velocity at closure and release were influenced by both the preceding and the following vowel. During the period of oral closure, the... (More)
Previous work has shown that the lips are moving at a high velocity when the oral closure occurs for bilabial stop consonants, resulting in tissue compression and mechanical interactions between the lips. The present experiment recorded tongue movements in four subjects during the production of velar and alveolar stop consonants to examine kinematic events before, during, and after the stop closure. The results show that, similar to the lips, the tongue is often moving at a high velocity at the onset of closure. The tongue movements were more complex, with both horizontal and vertical components. Movement velocity at closure and release were influenced by both the preceding and the following vowel. During the period of oral closure, the tongue moved through a trajectory of usually less than I cm; again, the magnitude of the movement was context dependent. Overall, the tongue moved in forward-backward curved paths. The results are compatible with the idea that the tongue is free to move during the closure as long as an airtight seal is maintained. A new interpretation of the curved movement paths of the tongue in speech is also proposed. This interpretation is based on the principle of cost minimization that has been successfully applied in the study of hand movements in reaching. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
volume
111
issue
6
pages
2811 - 2827
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • pmid:12083216
  • wos:000176195200035
  • scopus:0036317634
ISSN
1520-8524
DOI
10.1121/1.1473636
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9c1d7e1c-0da0-46b5-8b3d-39ea011e41d1 (old id 335485)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12083216
date added to LUP
2007-11-02 09:34:55
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:25:01
@article{9c1d7e1c-0da0-46b5-8b3d-39ea011e41d1,
  abstract     = {Previous work has shown that the lips are moving at a high velocity when the oral closure occurs for bilabial stop consonants, resulting in tissue compression and mechanical interactions between the lips. The present experiment recorded tongue movements in four subjects during the production of velar and alveolar stop consonants to examine kinematic events before, during, and after the stop closure. The results show that, similar to the lips, the tongue is often moving at a high velocity at the onset of closure. The tongue movements were more complex, with both horizontal and vertical components. Movement velocity at closure and release were influenced by both the preceding and the following vowel. During the period of oral closure, the tongue moved through a trajectory of usually less than I cm; again, the magnitude of the movement was context dependent. Overall, the tongue moved in forward-backward curved paths. The results are compatible with the idea that the tongue is free to move during the closure as long as an airtight seal is maintained. A new interpretation of the curved movement paths of the tongue in speech is also proposed. This interpretation is based on the principle of cost minimization that has been successfully applied in the study of hand movements in reaching.},
  author       = {Löfqvist, Anders and Gracco, VL},
  issn         = {1520-8524},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2811--2827},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  title        = {Control of oral closure in lingual stop consonant production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.1473636},
  volume       = {111},
  year         = {2002},
}