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Visual field structure in the Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae): dimensions and regional variation in acuity

Rutowski, RL and Warrant, Eric LU (2002) In Journal of Comparative Physiology A 188(1). p.1-12
Abstract
Male Empress Leilia butterflies (Asterocampa leilia) use a sit-and-wait tactic to locate mates. To see how vision might influence male behavior, we studied the morphology, optics, and receptor physiology of their eyes and found the following. (1) Each eye's visual field is approximately hemispherical with at most a 10degrees overlap in the fields of the eyes. There are no large sexual differences in visual field dimensions. (2) In both sexes, rhabdoms in the frontal and dorsal ommatidia are longer than those in other eye regions. (3) Interommatidial angles are smallest frontally and around the equator of the eye. Minimum interommatidial angles are 0.9-1degrees in males and 1.3-1.4degrees in females. (4) Acceptance angles of ommatidia... (More)
Male Empress Leilia butterflies (Asterocampa leilia) use a sit-and-wait tactic to locate mates. To see how vision might influence male behavior, we studied the morphology, optics, and receptor physiology of their eyes and found the following. (1) Each eye's visual field is approximately hemispherical with at most a 10degrees overlap in the fields of the eyes. There are no large sexual differences in visual field dimensions. (2) In both sexes, rhabdoms in the frontal and dorsal ommatidia are longer than those in other eye regions. (3) Interommatidial angles are smallest frontally and around the equator of the eye. Minimum interommatidial angles are 0.9-1degrees in males and 1.3-1.4degrees in females. (4) Acceptance angles of ommatidia closely match interommatidial angles in the frontal region of the eye. We conclude that vision in these butterflies is mostly monocular and that males have more acute vision than females, especially in the frontal region (large facets, small interommatidial angles, small acceptance angles, long rhabdoms, and a close match between interommatidial angles and acceptance angles). This study also suggests that perched males direct their most acute vision where females are likely to appear but show no eye modifications that appear clearly related to a mate-locating tactic. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
structure, butterfly vision, visual field, asterocampa leilia (Nymphalidae), eye morphology, acute zone
in
Journal of Comparative Physiology A
volume
188
issue
1
pages
1 - 12
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:11935226
  • wos:000176117000001
  • scopus:0036488851
ISSN
1432-1351
DOI
10.1007/s00359-001-0273-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
53c7b68c-c0b8-49b0-8347-d1e67f8a34bd (old id 335499)
date added to LUP
2007-11-12 13:31:52
date last changed
2017-02-05 04:15:46
@article{53c7b68c-c0b8-49b0-8347-d1e67f8a34bd,
  abstract     = {Male Empress Leilia butterflies (Asterocampa leilia) use a sit-and-wait tactic to locate mates. To see how vision might influence male behavior, we studied the morphology, optics, and receptor physiology of their eyes and found the following. (1) Each eye's visual field is approximately hemispherical with at most a 10degrees overlap in the fields of the eyes. There are no large sexual differences in visual field dimensions. (2) In both sexes, rhabdoms in the frontal and dorsal ommatidia are longer than those in other eye regions. (3) Interommatidial angles are smallest frontally and around the equator of the eye. Minimum interommatidial angles are 0.9-1degrees in males and 1.3-1.4degrees in females. (4) Acceptance angles of ommatidia closely match interommatidial angles in the frontal region of the eye. We conclude that vision in these butterflies is mostly monocular and that males have more acute vision than females, especially in the frontal region (large facets, small interommatidial angles, small acceptance angles, long rhabdoms, and a close match between interommatidial angles and acceptance angles). This study also suggests that perched males direct their most acute vision where females are likely to appear but show no eye modifications that appear clearly related to a mate-locating tactic.},
  author       = {Rutowski, RL and Warrant, Eric},
  issn         = {1432-1351},
  keyword      = {structure,butterfly vision,visual field,asterocampa leilia (Nymphalidae),eye morphology,acute zone},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--12},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  title        = {Visual field structure in the Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae): dimensions and regional variation in acuity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00359-001-0273-7},
  volume       = {188},
  year         = {2002},
}