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Are collagenous and lymphocytic colitis different aspects of the same disease?

Vigren, Lina LU ; Olesen, Martin; Benoni, Cecilia LU and Sjöberg, Klas LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 47(12). p.1448-1453
Abstract
Objective. Collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC) are two subtypes of microscopic colitis (MC). Even though they most often are described as different entities they share many clinical and histological features. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of conversion between CC and LC in a larger cohort of patients. Materials and methods. All 664 patients in our Pathology register with a diagnosis of CC and LC were scrutinized and those where additional endoscopies had been carried out were included, and their biopsies were re-examined. Results. Sixty-five patients (55 women, 10 men, median age 58 years; range 29-86) fulfilled our criteria for inclusion. The primary diagnosis was CC in 47 patients (39 women, 8... (More)
Objective. Collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC) are two subtypes of microscopic colitis (MC). Even though they most often are described as different entities they share many clinical and histological features. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of conversion between CC and LC in a larger cohort of patients. Materials and methods. All 664 patients in our Pathology register with a diagnosis of CC and LC were scrutinized and those where additional endoscopies had been carried out were included, and their biopsies were re-examined. Results. Sixty-five patients (55 women, 10 men, median age 58 years; range 29-86) fulfilled our criteria for inclusion. The primary diagnosis was CC in 47 patients (39 women, 8 men, median age 58 years; range 29-86) and LC in 18 patients (16 women, 2 men, median age 58 years; range 33-74). Conversion occurred in nine of the 65 patients (14%, all women, median age 59 years; range 41-72), three from CC to LC and six from LC to CC. Conclusion. This study has found that patients can show histological features consistent with both CC and LC over time. These patients could represent a subgroup with a true conversion between two separate entities. Alternatively, MC could be a spectral disease where the varying histological features are manifestations of the natural fluctuation. A third possibility could be that the histological changes reflect different manifestations during the disease course and consequently, the diagnostic criteria could be too vague. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bile acid diarrhea, coeliac disease, collagenous colitis, conversion, follow-up, lymphocytic colitis, microscopic colitis
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
47
issue
12
pages
1448 - 1453
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000312427800006
  • scopus:84869995780
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.3109/00365521.2012.729085
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b085faf9-38aa-4b6a-a72d-f5d039a45cb2 (old id 3366291)
date added to LUP
2013-02-01 06:56:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:13:05
@article{b085faf9-38aa-4b6a-a72d-f5d039a45cb2,
  abstract     = {Objective. Collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC) are two subtypes of microscopic colitis (MC). Even though they most often are described as different entities they share many clinical and histological features. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of conversion between CC and LC in a larger cohort of patients. Materials and methods. All 664 patients in our Pathology register with a diagnosis of CC and LC were scrutinized and those where additional endoscopies had been carried out were included, and their biopsies were re-examined. Results. Sixty-five patients (55 women, 10 men, median age 58 years; range 29-86) fulfilled our criteria for inclusion. The primary diagnosis was CC in 47 patients (39 women, 8 men, median age 58 years; range 29-86) and LC in 18 patients (16 women, 2 men, median age 58 years; range 33-74). Conversion occurred in nine of the 65 patients (14%, all women, median age 59 years; range 41-72), three from CC to LC and six from LC to CC. Conclusion. This study has found that patients can show histological features consistent with both CC and LC over time. These patients could represent a subgroup with a true conversion between two separate entities. Alternatively, MC could be a spectral disease where the varying histological features are manifestations of the natural fluctuation. A third possibility could be that the histological changes reflect different manifestations during the disease course and consequently, the diagnostic criteria could be too vague.},
  author       = {Vigren, Lina and Olesen, Martin and Benoni, Cecilia and Sjöberg, Klas},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  keyword      = {bile acid diarrhea,coeliac disease,collagenous colitis,conversion,follow-up,lymphocytic colitis,microscopic colitis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1448--1453},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Are collagenous and lymphocytic colitis different aspects of the same disease?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2012.729085},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2012},
}