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Comparison of oil from Nigella damascena seed recovered by pressing, conventional solvent extraction and carbon dioxide extraction

Dauksas, E; Venskutonis, PR and Sivik, Björn LU (2002) In Journal of Food Science 67(3). p.1021-1024
Abstract
Nigella damascena seeds were extracted by cold press, in a Soxhlet apparatus and with CO2 The yield obtained with liquid CO2 was only 10.57%. EtOH (1%) increased the yield by 50%. CO2-extracts were separated into the 2 fractions. The yield in the first fraction increased 2 times by increasing the pressure from 150 to 350 bar. EtOH (1%) increased the yield 2 times at 150 bar. Linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (43.71 to 50.83%), followed by oleic (14.87 to 23.65%), stearic (15.07 to 23.24%), and palmitic (10.13 to 12.07%) acids. Elemenes (21.38% to 29.16%) were the most abundant volatile constituents, free fatty acids constituted from 35.04% to 51.18%, the majority being linoleic (32.83 to 40.58) (Range for linoleic should be 24.51 to... (More)
Nigella damascena seeds were extracted by cold press, in a Soxhlet apparatus and with CO2 The yield obtained with liquid CO2 was only 10.57%. EtOH (1%) increased the yield by 50%. CO2-extracts were separated into the 2 fractions. The yield in the first fraction increased 2 times by increasing the pressure from 150 to 350 bar. EtOH (1%) increased the yield 2 times at 150 bar. Linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (43.71 to 50.83%), followed by oleic (14.87 to 23.65%), stearic (15.07 to 23.24%), and palmitic (10.13 to 12.07%) acids. Elemenes (21.38% to 29.16%) were the most abundant volatile constituents, free fatty acids constituted from 35.04% to 51.18%, the majority being linoleic (32.83 to 40.58) (Range for linoleic should be 24.51 to 40.58%-see Table 3) and oleic acids (4.96 to 13.32). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
elemenes, linoleic acid, volatile oil, Nigella damascena, composition
in
Journal of Food Science
volume
67
issue
3
pages
1021 - 1024
publisher
Institute of Food Technologists
external identifiers
  • wos:000175794600023
  • scopus:0036262712
ISSN
0022-1147
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09447.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
805175a7-91c7-4586-b44d-9a0ddba52396 (old id 337161)
date added to LUP
2007-08-15 16:05:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:15:04
@article{805175a7-91c7-4586-b44d-9a0ddba52396,
  abstract     = {Nigella damascena seeds were extracted by cold press, in a Soxhlet apparatus and with CO2 The yield obtained with liquid CO2 was only 10.57%. EtOH (1%) increased the yield by 50%. CO2-extracts were separated into the 2 fractions. The yield in the first fraction increased 2 times by increasing the pressure from 150 to 350 bar. EtOH (1%) increased the yield 2 times at 150 bar. Linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (43.71 to 50.83%), followed by oleic (14.87 to 23.65%), stearic (15.07 to 23.24%), and palmitic (10.13 to 12.07%) acids. Elemenes (21.38% to 29.16%) were the most abundant volatile constituents, free fatty acids constituted from 35.04% to 51.18%, the majority being linoleic (32.83 to 40.58) (Range for linoleic should be 24.51 to 40.58%-see Table 3) and oleic acids (4.96 to 13.32).},
  author       = {Dauksas, E and Venskutonis, PR and Sivik, Björn},
  issn         = {0022-1147},
  keyword      = {elemenes,linoleic acid,volatile oil,Nigella damascena,composition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1021--1024},
  publisher    = {Institute of Food Technologists},
  series       = {Journal of Food Science},
  title        = {Comparison of oil from Nigella damascena seed recovered by pressing, conventional solvent extraction and carbon dioxide extraction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2621.2002.tb09447.x},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2002},
}