Advanced

Redesigning a closed-loop supply chain exposed to risks

Lundin, Johan LU (2012) In International Journal of Production Economics 140(2). p.596-603
Abstract
Supply chain management includes coordination and motivation of independently operating partners. Therefore, it is important to align logistics structures, processes and incentives, especially when making major changes involving those components. Traditionally, cost, quality, and service have served as prioritized performance indicators for supply chains, but lately risk is also taken into consideration (Tang, 2006), especially when studying risk-exposed supply chains. This paper presents a case study of a cash supply chain (CSC). A CSC provides society with notes and coins (Rajamani et al., 2006), which typically involves two parties working together: a central bank and a group of private actors (private banks and logistics... (More)
Supply chain management includes coordination and motivation of independently operating partners. Therefore, it is important to align logistics structures, processes and incentives, especially when making major changes involving those components. Traditionally, cost, quality, and service have served as prioritized performance indicators for supply chains, but lately risk is also taken into consideration (Tang, 2006), especially when studying risk-exposed supply chains. This paper presents a case study of a cash supply chain (CSC). A CSC provides society with notes and coins (Rajamani et al., 2006), which typically involves two parties working together: a central bank and a group of private actors (private banks and logistics service/security providers). Together, they form a closed-loop supply chain (see Guide and Van Wassenhove, 2006), which through their storage facilities and transport means supply cash to their customers (ATMs, bank branches, and retailers), whom in turn enables society's cash consumption. The CSC studied in this paper has during the last couple of years gone through several design changes in network structure (e.g. reducing number of storage facilities), processes (outsourcing), and incentive mechanisms (payment schemes and policies). Most design changes were carried out in order to decrease number of transports from and to central bank storage facilities, nevertheless some of them led to unintended effects (so-called misalignments). Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present a model that determines effects caused by design changes in a CSC. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Supply chain design, Closed-loop supply chain, Cash supply chain, Network flow modeling, Risk management
in
International Journal of Production Economics
volume
140
issue
2
pages
596 - 603
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000311193200006
  • scopus:84866740877
ISSN
0925-5273
DOI
10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.01.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
916a750f-e651-4fe1-a292-81ecc1bebdd7 (old id 3379467)
date added to LUP
2013-01-30 14:44:17
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:22:19
@article{916a750f-e651-4fe1-a292-81ecc1bebdd7,
  abstract     = {Supply chain management includes coordination and motivation of independently operating partners. Therefore, it is important to align logistics structures, processes and incentives, especially when making major changes involving those components. Traditionally, cost, quality, and service have served as prioritized performance indicators for supply chains, but lately risk is also taken into consideration (Tang, 2006), especially when studying risk-exposed supply chains. This paper presents a case study of a cash supply chain (CSC). A CSC provides society with notes and coins (Rajamani et al., 2006), which typically involves two parties working together: a central bank and a group of private actors (private banks and logistics service/security providers). Together, they form a closed-loop supply chain (see Guide and Van Wassenhove, 2006), which through their storage facilities and transport means supply cash to their customers (ATMs, bank branches, and retailers), whom in turn enables society's cash consumption. The CSC studied in this paper has during the last couple of years gone through several design changes in network structure (e.g. reducing number of storage facilities), processes (outsourcing), and incentive mechanisms (payment schemes and policies). Most design changes were carried out in order to decrease number of transports from and to central bank storage facilities, nevertheless some of them led to unintended effects (so-called misalignments). Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present a model that determines effects caused by design changes in a CSC. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Lundin, Johan},
  issn         = {0925-5273},
  keyword      = {Supply chain design,Closed-loop supply chain,Cash supply chain,Network flow modeling,Risk management},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {596--603},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Production Economics},
  title        = {Redesigning a closed-loop supply chain exposed to risks},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.01.010},
  volume       = {140},
  year         = {2012},
}