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Cognitive impairment is undetected in medical inpatients: a study of mortality and recognition amongst healthcare professionals

Torisson, Gustav LU ; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Stavenow, Lars and Londos, Elisabet LU (2012) In BMC Geriatrics 12(47).
Abstract
Background

Detecting cognitive impairment in medical inpatients is important due to its association with adverse outcomes. Our aim was to study recognition of cognitive impairment and its association with mortality.



Methods

200 inpatients aged over 60 years were recruited at the Department of General Internal Medicine at University Hospital MAS in Malmö, Sweden. The MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and the CDT (Clock-Drawing Test) were performed and related to recognition rates by patients, staff physicians, nurses and informants. The impact of abnormal cognitive test results on mortality was studied using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression.



Results

55... (More)
Background

Detecting cognitive impairment in medical inpatients is important due to its association with adverse outcomes. Our aim was to study recognition of cognitive impairment and its association with mortality.



Methods

200 inpatients aged over 60 years were recruited at the Department of General Internal Medicine at University Hospital MAS in Malmö, Sweden. The MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and the CDT (Clock-Drawing Test) were performed and related to recognition rates by patients, staff physicians, nurses and informants. The impact of abnormal cognitive test results on mortality was studied using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression.



Results

55 patients (28%) had no cognitive impairment while 68 patients (34%) had 1 abnormal test result (on MMSE or CDT) and 77 patients (39%) had 2 abnormal test results. Recognition by healthcare professionals was 12% in the group with 1 abnormal test and 44-64% in the group with 2 abnormal test results. In our model, cognitive impairment predicted 12-month mortality with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 2.86 (1.28-6.39) for the group with 1 abnormal cognitive test and 3.39 (1.54-7.45) for the group with 2 abnormal test results.



Conclusions

Cognitive impairment is frequent in medical inpatients and associated with increased mortality. Recognition rates of cognitive impairment need to be improved in hospitals. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cognitive impairment, Medical inpatients, Mortality
in
BMC Geriatrics
volume
12
issue
47
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000313488100001
  • scopus:84865306375
ISSN
1471-2318
DOI
10.1186/1471-2318-12-47
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
767ffebc-977d-4454-aaf7-6053c95c203a (old id 3459117)
date added to LUP
2013-02-07 11:57:35
date last changed
2017-06-18 04:15:02
@article{767ffebc-977d-4454-aaf7-6053c95c203a,
  abstract     = {Background<br/><br>
Detecting cognitive impairment in medical inpatients is important due to its association with adverse outcomes. Our aim was to study recognition of cognitive impairment and its association with mortality. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
200 inpatients aged over 60 years were recruited at the Department of General Internal Medicine at University Hospital MAS in Malmö, Sweden. The MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and the CDT (Clock-Drawing Test) were performed and related to recognition rates by patients, staff physicians, nurses and informants. The impact of abnormal cognitive test results on mortality was studied using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
55 patients (28%) had no cognitive impairment while 68 patients (34%) had 1 abnormal test result (on MMSE or CDT) and 77 patients (39%) had 2 abnormal test results. Recognition by healthcare professionals was 12% in the group with 1 abnormal test and 44-64% in the group with 2 abnormal test results. In our model, cognitive impairment predicted 12-month mortality with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 2.86 (1.28-6.39) for the group with 1 abnormal cognitive test and 3.39 (1.54-7.45) for the group with 2 abnormal test results. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions<br/><br>
Cognitive impairment is frequent in medical inpatients and associated with increased mortality. Recognition rates of cognitive impairment need to be improved in hospitals.},
  author       = {Torisson, Gustav and Minthon, Lennart and Stavenow, Lars and Londos, Elisabet},
  issn         = {1471-2318},
  keyword      = {Cognitive impairment,Medical inpatients,Mortality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {47},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Geriatrics},
  title        = {Cognitive impairment is undetected in medical inpatients: a study of mortality and recognition amongst healthcare professionals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2318-12-47},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2012},
}