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Modeling the meaning of words: Neural correlates of abstract and concrete noun processing

Mårtensson, Frida LU ; Roll, Mikael LU ; Apt, Pia and Horne, Merle LU (2011) In Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis 71(4). p.455-478
Abstract
We present a model relating analysis of abstract and concrete word meaning in terms of semantic features and contextual frames within a general framework of neurocognitive information processing. The approach taken here assumes concrete noun meanings to be intimately related to sensory feature constellations. These features are processed by posterior sensory regions of the brain, e.g. the occipital lobe, which handles visual information. The interpretation of abstract nouns, however, is likely to be more dependent on semantic frames and linguistic context. A greater involvement of more anteriorly located, perisylvian brain areas has previously been found for the processing of abstract words. In the present study, a word association test... (More)
We present a model relating analysis of abstract and concrete word meaning in terms of semantic features and contextual frames within a general framework of neurocognitive information processing. The approach taken here assumes concrete noun meanings to be intimately related to sensory feature constellations. These features are processed by posterior sensory regions of the brain, e.g. the occipital lobe, which handles visual information. The interpretation of abstract nouns, however, is likely to be more dependent on semantic frames and linguistic context. A greater involvement of more anteriorly located, perisylvian brain areas has previously been found for the processing of abstract words. In the present study, a word association test was carried out in order to compare semantic processing in healthy subjects (n=12) with subjects with aphasia due to perisylvian lesions (n=3) and occipital lesions (n=1). The word associations were coded into different categories depending on their semantic content. A double dissociation was found, where, compared to the controls, the perisylvian aphasic subjects had problems associating to abstract nouns and produced fewer semantic frame-based associations, whereas the occipital aphasic subject showed disturbances in concrete noun processing and made fewer semantic feature based associations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
mental lexicon, abstract words, concrete words, semantic frames, semantic features, neurocognition, aphasia
in
Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis
volume
71
issue
4
pages
455 - 478
publisher
Polish Neuroscience Society - PTBUN, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology
external identifiers
  • wos:000299368200004
  • scopus:84855775860
ISSN
0065-1400
project
Abstrakta, emotionella och konkreta ord i det mentala lexikonet
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3486352d-f2ae-475b-a6b8-6557363e48e1 (old id 2293768)
alternative location
http://www.ane.pl/showarticle.php?art=7148
date added to LUP
2012-01-17 17:05:10
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:09:36
@article{3486352d-f2ae-475b-a6b8-6557363e48e1,
  abstract     = {We present a model relating analysis of abstract and concrete word meaning in terms of semantic features and contextual frames within a general framework of neurocognitive information processing. The approach taken here assumes concrete noun meanings to be intimately related to sensory feature constellations. These features are processed by posterior sensory regions of the brain, e.g. the occipital lobe, which handles visual information. The interpretation of abstract nouns, however, is likely to be more dependent on semantic frames and linguistic context. A greater involvement of more anteriorly located, perisylvian brain areas has previously been found for the processing of abstract words. In the present study, a word association test was carried out in order to compare semantic processing in healthy subjects (n=12) with subjects with aphasia due to perisylvian lesions (n=3) and occipital lesions (n=1). The word associations were coded into different categories depending on their semantic content. A double dissociation was found, where, compared to the controls, the perisylvian aphasic subjects had problems associating to abstract nouns and produced fewer semantic frame-based associations, whereas the occipital aphasic subject showed disturbances in concrete noun processing and made fewer semantic feature based associations.},
  author       = {Mårtensson, Frida and Roll, Mikael and Apt, Pia and Horne, Merle},
  issn         = {0065-1400},
  keyword      = {mental lexicon,abstract words,concrete words,semantic frames,semantic features,neurocognition,aphasia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {455--478},
  publisher    = {Polish Neuroscience Society - PTBUN, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology},
  series       = {Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis},
  title        = {Modeling the meaning of words: Neural correlates of abstract and concrete noun processing},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2011},
}