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Long-term improvements after mindfulness-based group therapy of depression, anxiety and stress and adjustment disorders : A randomized controlled trial

Sundquist, Jan LU ; Palmér, Karolina LU ; Memon, Ashfaque A. LU ; Wang, Xiao LU ; Johansson, Leena M. LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2018) In Early Intervention in Psychiatry
Abstract

Background: Although mindfulness-based group therapies (MGTs) for depressive, anxiety or stress and adjustment disorders are promising, there is a substantial lack of knowledge regarding the long-term improvements after such therapies in these common psychiatric disorders. Methods: Two hundred and fifteen patients were randomized in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01476371) conducted in 2012 at 16 primary healthcare centres in southern Sweden. The patients were randomized to MGT or treatment as usual (TAU) and completed four psychometric self-rated scales after 8 weeks of treatment. Approximately 12months after the completion of the 8-week treatment, the same scales were repeated. Ordinal and generalized... (More)

Background: Although mindfulness-based group therapies (MGTs) for depressive, anxiety or stress and adjustment disorders are promising, there is a substantial lack of knowledge regarding the long-term improvements after such therapies in these common psychiatric disorders. Methods: Two hundred and fifteen patients were randomized in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01476371) conducted in 2012 at 16 primary healthcare centres in southern Sweden. The patients were randomized to MGT or treatment as usual (TAU) and completed four psychometric self-rated scales after 8 weeks of treatment. Approximately 12months after the completion of the 8-week treatment, the same scales were repeated. Ordinal and generalized linear-mixed models, adjusted for cluster effects, were used for the analysis. Results: For all four psychometric scales (MADRS-S [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-S], HADS-D, HADS-A [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale A and D] and PHQ-9 [Patient Health Questionnaire-9]) the scores at the 1-year follow-up were significantly improved (all P values <0.001) in both groups. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the MGT and TAU in the psychometric scores at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first RCT comparing the long-term improvements after MGT with TAU. Although it cannot be excluded that our findings are a result of the natural course of common psychiatric disorders or other factors, they suggest a long-term positive improvement after both MGT and TAU.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Mindfulness, Primary healthcare, Randomized controlled trial
in
Early Intervention in Psychiatry
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85050503790
ISSN
1751-7885
DOI
10.1111/eip.12715
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34993af1-b1bf-4cb0-9100-8aa7826fde58
date added to LUP
2018-09-18 15:07:01
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:27:13
@article{34993af1-b1bf-4cb0-9100-8aa7826fde58,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Although mindfulness-based group therapies (MGTs) for depressive, anxiety or stress and adjustment disorders are promising, there is a substantial lack of knowledge regarding the long-term improvements after such therapies in these common psychiatric disorders. Methods: Two hundred and fifteen patients were randomized in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01476371) conducted in 2012 at 16 primary healthcare centres in southern Sweden. The patients were randomized to MGT or treatment as usual (TAU) and completed four psychometric self-rated scales after 8 weeks of treatment. Approximately 12months after the completion of the 8-week treatment, the same scales were repeated. Ordinal and generalized linear-mixed models, adjusted for cluster effects, were used for the analysis. Results: For all four psychometric scales (MADRS-S [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-S], HADS-D, HADS-A [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale A and D] and PHQ-9 [Patient Health Questionnaire-9]) the scores at the 1-year follow-up were significantly improved (all P values &lt;0.001) in both groups. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the MGT and TAU in the psychometric scores at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first RCT comparing the long-term improvements after MGT with TAU. Although it cannot be excluded that our findings are a result of the natural course of common psychiatric disorders or other factors, they suggest a long-term positive improvement after both MGT and TAU.</p>},
  author       = {Sundquist, Jan and Palmér, Karolina and Memon, Ashfaque A. and Wang, Xiao and Johansson, Leena M. and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1751-7885},
  keyword      = {Anxiety,Depression,Mindfulness,Primary healthcare,Randomized controlled trial},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Early Intervention in Psychiatry},
  title        = {Long-term improvements after mindfulness-based group therapy of depression, anxiety and stress and adjustment disorders : A randomized controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eip.12715},
  year         = {2018},
}