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Passive versus active operator work in automated process control - a job design case study in a control center

Persson, Anders; Wanek, Birgitta LU and Johansson, Anja (2001) In Applied Ergonomics 32(5). p.441-451
Abstract
Methods of avoiding common problems associated with operator work in automated process control, such as understimulation and difficulties in achieving and maintaining necessary skills and competence, are addressed in this paper. The source of these problems is deduced here to be that monitoring tasks are a predominant part of the job. This case study shows how work in a highly automated process can be designed not only to avoid the traditional problems, but also provide a stimulating job within a good work situation at the same time as fulfilling efficiency demands. A new definition of active/passive operator jobs is made which is based on categorisation of the types of work tasks that make up the job. The definition gives an explanation... (More)
Methods of avoiding common problems associated with operator work in automated process control, such as understimulation and difficulties in achieving and maintaining necessary skills and competence, are addressed in this paper. The source of these problems is deduced here to be that monitoring tasks are a predominant part of the job. This case study shows how work in a highly automated process can be designed not only to avoid the traditional problems, but also provide a stimulating job within a good work situation at the same time as fulfilling efficiency demands. A new definition of active/passive operator jobs is made which is based on categorisation of the types of work tasks that make up the job. The definition gives an explanation of how different designs of operator jobs result in more or less active/passive work situations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Job desing, Process operator, Uneventful monotony, Psychosocial work environment
in
Applied Ergonomics
volume
32
issue
5
pages
441 - 451
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034910467
ISSN
1872-9126
DOI
10.1016/S0003-6870(01)00022-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e40119bb-4a3e-4161-a978-5b7b59c6e41d (old id 3626220)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003687001000229
date added to LUP
2013-03-26 13:12:52
date last changed
2018-01-07 08:44:16
@article{e40119bb-4a3e-4161-a978-5b7b59c6e41d,
  abstract     = {Methods of avoiding common problems associated with operator work in automated process control, such as understimulation and difficulties in achieving and maintaining necessary skills and competence, are addressed in this paper. The source of these problems is deduced here to be that monitoring tasks are a predominant part of the job. This case study shows how work in a highly automated process can be designed not only to avoid the traditional problems, but also provide a stimulating job within a good work situation at the same time as fulfilling efficiency demands. A new definition of active/passive operator jobs is made which is based on categorisation of the types of work tasks that make up the job. The definition gives an explanation of how different designs of operator jobs result in more or less active/passive work situations.},
  author       = {Persson, Anders and Wanek, Birgitta and Johansson, Anja},
  issn         = {1872-9126},
  keyword      = {Job desing,Process operator,Uneventful monotony,Psychosocial work environment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {441--451},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Applied Ergonomics},
  title        = {Passive versus active operator work in automated process control - a job design case study in a control center},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0003-6870(01)00022-9},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2001},
}