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Socioeconomic status, social capital and self-reported unmet health care needs : A population-based study

Lindström, Christine LU ; Rosvall, Maria LU and Lindstrom, Martin LU (2017) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 45(3). p.212-221
Abstract

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and self-reported unmet health care needs, taking economic stress, generalized trust in other people and trust in the health care system into account. Methods: The 2012 public health survey in Scania was conducted using a postal questionnaire and included 28,029 participants aged 18-80 years. The study was cross-sectional. Associations between SES and unmet health care needs were investigated, adjusting for economic stress and trust in logistic regressions. Results: SES was significantly associated with unmet health care needs. The SES categories of unemployed, on long-term sick leave and unskilled manual workers reported particularly high... (More)

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and self-reported unmet health care needs, taking economic stress, generalized trust in other people and trust in the health care system into account. Methods: The 2012 public health survey in Scania was conducted using a postal questionnaire and included 28,029 participants aged 18-80 years. The study was cross-sectional. Associations between SES and unmet health care needs were investigated, adjusting for economic stress and trust in logistic regressions. Results: SES was significantly associated with unmet health care needs. The SES categories of unemployed, on long-term sick leave and unskilled manual workers reported particularly high levels of unmet health care needs. SES differences in unmet needs were attenuated when economic stress and the two dimensions of trust and self-rated health were introduced in multiple analyses. The working population gave a lack of time as the reason for unmet health care needs, whereas those on sick leave or unemployed reported a lack of money. Conclusions: SES differences in self-reported unmet health care needs were observed and these associations were attenuated when economic stress during the past year, generalized trust in other people, trust in the health care system and self-rated health were introduced into the multiple models.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
generalized trust in other people, self-rated health, social capital, socioeconomic status, Sweden, trust in the health care system, Unmet health care needs
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
45
issue
3
pages
10 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85018729757
  • wos:000400160200002
ISSN
1403-4948
DOI
10.1177/1403494816689345
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
367d0cd4-754b-4dc1-8c42-e1409edd6df2
date added to LUP
2017-06-08 14:14:09
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:39:37
@article{367d0cd4-754b-4dc1-8c42-e1409edd6df2,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and self-reported unmet health care needs, taking economic stress, generalized trust in other people and trust in the health care system into account. Methods: The 2012 public health survey in Scania was conducted using a postal questionnaire and included 28,029 participants aged 18-80 years. The study was cross-sectional. Associations between SES and unmet health care needs were investigated, adjusting for economic stress and trust in logistic regressions. Results: SES was significantly associated with unmet health care needs. The SES categories of unemployed, on long-term sick leave and unskilled manual workers reported particularly high levels of unmet health care needs. SES differences in unmet needs were attenuated when economic stress and the two dimensions of trust and self-rated health were introduced in multiple analyses. The working population gave a lack of time as the reason for unmet health care needs, whereas those on sick leave or unemployed reported a lack of money. Conclusions: SES differences in self-reported unmet health care needs were observed and these associations were attenuated when economic stress during the past year, generalized trust in other people, trust in the health care system and self-rated health were introduced into the multiple models.</p>},
  author       = {Lindström, Christine and Rosvall, Maria and Lindstrom, Martin},
  issn         = {1403-4948},
  keyword      = {generalized trust in other people,self-rated health,social capital,socioeconomic status,Sweden,trust in the health care system,Unmet health care needs},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {212--221},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Socioeconomic status, social capital and self-reported unmet health care needs : A population-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494816689345},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2017},
}